berceuse

noun

ber·​ceuse ber-ˈsœz How to pronounce berceuse (audio) -ˈsüz How to pronounce berceuse (audio)
plural berceuses ber-ˈsœz How to pronounce berceuse (audio)
-ˈsüz,
-ˈsü-zəz
1
: a musical composition usually in ⁶/₈ time that resembles a lullaby
2

Did you know?

The lullaby is a standard of classical music. German composer Johannes Brahms is perhaps best known for his "Wiegenlied: Guten Abend, gute Nacht" ("Good evening, good night"), Op. 49, No. 4, published in 1868, purportedly written for a friend to celebrate the birth of her son. Compositionally, a berceuse is similar to a lullaby, particularly in its soothing refrain often set to a rocking rhythm usually in 6/8 time. Among the earliest examples of works known by that name is Frédéric Chopin's Berceuse in D-flat Major (1843-44), written for piano; Franz Liszt, Camille Saint-Saëns, and Maurice Ravel also composed berceuses. The word berceuse is indicative of its use as an aid to sleep-it derives from the French bercer ("to rock") and ultimately from the Old French bers ("cradle").

Examples of berceuse in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The third berceuse is from a late scene where one of the guests attempts a magic ritual and fails, demanding the slaughter of an innocent person. Christian Hertzog, San Diego Union-Tribune, 8 Aug. 2023 The second of two great septuagenarian pianists passing through New York this week brings with him an all-Chopin program, featuring two sets of nocturnes, a couple of ballades, a scherzo, a berceuse and the third of the composer’s sonatas. David Allen, New York Times, 18 May 2017

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'berceuse.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

French, from bercer to rock, from Old French bercier, from bers cradle

First Known Use

1858, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of berceuse was in 1858

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Cite this Entry

“Berceuse.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/berceuse. Accessed 15 Jun. 2024.

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