bare

adjective
\ ˈber How to pronounce bare (audio) \
barer; barest

Definition of bare

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : lacking a natural, usual, or appropriate covering
b(1) : lacking clothing bare feet
(2) obsolete : bareheaded
c : lacking any tool or weapon opened the box with his bare hands
2 : open to view : exposed laying bare their secrets
3a : unfurnished or scantily supplied a bare room
b : destitute bare of all safeguards
4a : having nothing left over or added the bare necessities of life
b : mere a bare two hours away
c : devoid of amplification or adornment the bare facts
5 obsolete : worthless

bare

verb
\ ˈber How to pronounce bare (audio) \
bared; baring

Definition of bare (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

: to make or lay (something) bare (see bare entry 1) : uncover

bare

Definition of bare (Entry 3 of 3)

archaic past tense of bear

Other Words from bare

Adjective

bareness noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for bare

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for bare

Adjective

bare, naked, nude, bald, barren mean deprived of naturally or conventionally appropriate covering. bare implies the removal of what is additional, superfluous, ornamental, or dispensable. an apartment with bare walls naked suggests absence of protective or ornamental covering but may imply a state of nature, of destitution, or of defenselessness. poor half-naked children nude applies especially to the unclothed human figure. a nude model posing for art students bald implies actual or seeming absence of natural covering and may suggest a conspicuous bareness. a bald mountain peak barren often suggests aridity or impoverishment or sterility. barren plains

Usage Note on Bear

Adjective

There is considerable confusion between the verbs bear and bare. It may help to remember that the verb bare has only one meaning: "to uncover," as in "bare your shoulders" and "a dog baring its teeth." All other uses of the verb are for bear: "bearing children," "the right to bear arms," "bearing up under the stress/weight," "can't bear the thought," "bear south," "it bears repeating."

There is occasional confusion between bear and bare in adjectival uses (as in "he rubbed his bear arms"), but bear is properly a noun and only used like an adjective in the financial phrase bear market. All other uses refer to the state of being uncovered or naked and should therefore be bare: "bare necessities," "bare essentials," "bare arms," "bare bones," "bare-knuckle," and so on.

Usage Note on Bear

Verb

There is considerable confusion between the verbs bear and bare. It may help to remember that the verb bare has only one meaning: "to uncover," as in "bare your shoulders" and "a dog baring its teeth." All other uses of the verb are for bear: "bearing children," "the right to bear arms," "bearing up under the stress/weight," "can't bear the thought," "bear south," "it bears repeating."

There is occasional confusion between bear and bare in adjectival uses (as in "he rubbed his bear arms"), but bear is properly a noun and only used like an adjective in the financial phrase bear market. All other uses refer to the state of being uncovered or naked and should therefore be bare: "bare necessities," "bare essentials," "bare arms," "bare bones," "bare-knuckle," and so on.

Examples of bare in a Sentence

Adjective The brittle-looking branches of bare trees reached up from the horizon, and smoke could be seen curling from the chimneys of the sturdy stone houses in the villages we passed through. — David McAninch, Saveur, November 2008 The dining room is warm and comfortable in a quasi-Tuscan-villa style, with bare wood floors, mottled walls,  … and a glass room divider etched with images of grapes. — Colman Andrews, Gourmet, March 2007 A scant two hours after his Derby victory, Monarchos was back in his … stall, beneath a bare bulb, eating carrots from a red bucket. — Steve Rushin, Sports Illustrated, 14 May 2001 There was a rug in the front room of the house, but the other floors were bare. Do not let the bare wires touch. He covered her bare arms with his coat. He had a glove on his left hand, but his right hand was bare. The ground was bare where the statue had stood for years. There was only one bare shelf. Her office was pretty bare, having only one desk and one chair. This is the barest room in the house. He only told me the bare facts about what happened. Verb Ed McMahon calls upon the canine coach to help him settle down his aggressive … terrier, which is nice to Ed but bares its teeth at guests. TV Guide, 29 Oct.-4 Nov. 2007 You could argue that the very act of conducting a lengthy poll by telephone skews the response pool. What sort of person bares her soul to pollsters for upward of an hour—and during the holiday season yet? — Katha Pollitt, Nation, 4/11 Aug. 2003 When Eastman called Death in the Afternoon (Hemingway's nonfiction book about bullfighting) "a literary style of wearing false hair on the chest," Hemingway had no other options than to bare his hirsute midsection and duke it out with his rival author in front of their editor, Max Perkins. The common mythology is that Hemingway beat Eastman to a bloody pulp, but Perkins' account had Eastman gaining the upper hand. — Will Manley, Booklist, 1 Apr. 2001 The better analogy is to bare all on the talk shows in which ordinary people are encouraged to reveal intimate aspects of their private lives. — Richard A. Posner, New Republic, 21 Aug. 2000 He bared his chest to show the scar. finally bared the secret that she had kept to herself for so long See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Eminem has never been shy about laying bare his personal struggles in his songs. Gil Kaufman, Billboard, 23 June 2022 The earlier segments of the report have laid bare the rampant corruption in government and state-owned companies during former President Jacob Zuma’s tenure from 2009 to 2018. Mogomotsi Magome, ajc, 22 June 2022 The starkness of war has laid bare the many ethical tensions that exist in surrogacy arrangements, casting into bold relief the power dynamics that underlie a contract in which a woman signs over the whole of her physical self. New York Times, 3 May 2022 The host’s texts with former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, for example, laid bare his critical role as fixer and consoler in chief for Trump associates. Washington Post, 26 Apr. 2022 Phones equipped with up-to-date cameras also became vital in transmitting to the outside world gruesome pictures that laid bare the realities of warfare. Elad Natanson, Forbes, 13 Apr. 2022 While daycare services haven’t been immune to widespread staffing shortages, the pandemic has laid bare the industry’s importance to the U.S. workforce, particularly in facilitating employment among women. Ruth Umoh, Fortune, 4 Mar. 2022 Musk laid bare his entire vision for the first time for all the world to see. Eric Berger, Ars Technica, 11 Feb. 2022 Tens of thousands of people marched in the streets demanding police reform, and countless more watched as the pandemic laid bare the inequities already present in our communities. Julia Wick, Los Angeles Times, 4 Feb. 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Just want to leave this here for the ignorant and arrogant people who have chosen to remain uneducated about what this means for we women who bare this burden. Charmaine Patterson, PEOPLE.com, 27 June 2022 And their journey to find that special someone lays bare their backgrounds, beliefs and preferences. Washington Post Staff, Washington Post, 21 July 2022 Viewers are met with an intimate gaze by the subjects, who bare their soul for my camera. Rica Cerbarano, Vogue, 11 July 2022 The pop icon has been known to bare it all on Instagram in the name of body positivity. Seventeen Editors, Seventeen, 7 June 2022 The movie lays bare a grudge that has become its own self-sustaining engine, unmoored from logic or reason. Sheri Linden, The Hollywood Reporter, 20 May 2022 Some took up a pen to bare their hearts for those who were to come. Devi Shastri, Journal Sentinel, 21 June 2022 For those willing to bare even more skin, crop tops are everywhere this year. Olivia O'bryon, Forbes, 17 Mar. 2022 Kriegman and Steinberg had experience getting subjects to bare uncomfortably intimate details of their personal lives on camera. Alexandra Schwartz, The New Yorker, 16 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'bare.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of bare

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for bare

Adjective and Verb

Middle English, from Old English bær; akin to Old High German bar naked, Lithuanian basas barefoot

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Time Traveler for bare

Time Traveler

The first known use of bare was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near bare

bardy

bare

bare'e

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Statistics for bare

Last Updated

4 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Bare.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bare. Accessed 9 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for bare

bare

adjective
\ ˈber How to pronounce bare (audio) \
barer; barest

Kids Definition of bare

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : having no covering : naked bare feet The trees were bare of leaves.
2 : empty entry 1 sense 1 The cupboard was bare.
3 : having nothing left over or added : mere the bare necessities … Thorton was abreast of him and a bare half-dozen strokes away …— Jack London, The Call of the Wild
4 : bald sense 2 the bare facts

bare

verb
bared; baring

Kids Definition of bare (Entry 2 of 2)

More from Merriam-Webster on bare

Nglish: Translation of bare for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bare for Arabic Speakers

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