analogue

noun
an·​a·​logue | \ˈa-nə-ˌlȯg, -ˌläg\
variants: or

Definition of analogue 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something that is similar or comparable to something else either in general or in some specific detail : something that is analogous to something else historical analogues to the current situation an aspirin analogue

2 : an organ or part similar in function to an organ or part of another animal or plant but different in structure and origin The gill of a fish is the analogue of the lung of a cat.

3 usually analog : a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but differs slightly in composition (as in the replacement of one atom by an atom of a different element or in the presence of a particular functional group)

4 : a food product made by combining a less expensive food (such as soybeans or whitefish) with additives to give the appearance and taste of a more expensive food (such as beef or crab)

analogue

an·​a·​logue

Definition of analogue (Entry 2 of 2)

chiefly British spelling of

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Did You Know?

Noun

The word analogue entered English from French in the 19th century and ultimately traces back to the Greek word logos, meaning "ratio." (The word analogy, which has been a part of English since the 15th century, also descends from logos.) The noun analogue is sometimes spelled analog, particularly when it refers to a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but slightly different in composition. Adding to the confusion, there is also an adjective spelled analog, which came into use in the 20th century. The adjective can refer to something that is analogous (as in an analog organ), but it is most often used to distinguish analog electronics from digital electronics (as in an analog computer or an analog clock).

Examples of analogue in a Sentence

Noun

a modern analog to what happened before the synthetic analog of a chemical found in a tropical tree a meat analogue such as tofu
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The next step will be to make a high tech analogue that doesn’t involve using a seal’s whiskers, facial nerve endings, and brain. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "The Military Could Track Objects Underwater With Seal Whiskers," 13 Aug. 2018 Tide can get marketing mileage out of concentrating a full cup of detergent into a cute little pod, but books have no such analogue. John Warner, chicagotribune.com, "Prize-winning: The biggest, boldest claim a bookseller can make," 30 May 2018 Gregg Fisher, a portfolio manager at the Gerstein Fisher Funds, cautioned that A.I. programs could be stumped by off-the-wall and out-of-the-blue developments that have no obvious analogues in their databases. Conrad De Aenlle, New York Times, "A.I. Has Arrived in Investing. Humans Are Still Dominating.," 12 Jan. 2018 So, the relevant committees are the Energy and Commerce committee in the House of Representatives and the analogue in the Senate. Eric Johnson, Recode, "Silicon Valley congressman Ro Khanna explains his ‘internet bill of rights’," 6 Oct. 2018 He was considered by many to be the black analogue to Paul Prudhomme. Mike Scott, NOLA.com, "'He was considered by many to be the black analogue to Paul Prudhomme'," 20 Apr. 2018 The area was widespread and open, an analogue to Wyoming with grills and bars at every turn. Steven J. Horowitz, Billboard, "Kanye West and Kid Cudi Debut 'Kids See Ghosts' Album in Santa Clarita," 8 June 2018 The defendants allegedly shipped fentanyl and its analogues through the mail. Sari Horwitz, Washington Post, "Ten people, including four Chinese nationals, charged in international fentanyl case," 27 Apr. 2018 The drug and its analogues are a fixture in Chicago’s narcotics trade, pressed into phony prescription pills or mixed into heroin. John Keilman, chicagotribune.com, "'Like finding a needle in a haystack': Agents trying to stop deadly opioid fentanyl from entering U.S. in tough battle," 12 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'analogue.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of analogue

Noun

1804, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for analogue

Noun

French analogue, from analogue analogous, from Greek analogos — see analogous

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Last Updated

9 Dec 2018

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Time Traveler for analogue

The first known use of analogue was in 1804

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More Definitions for analogue

analogue

noun

English Language Learners Definition of analogue

: something that is similar to something else in design, origin, use, etc. : something that is analogous to something else

analogue

noun
an·​a·​logue
variants: or analog \ˈan-​ᵊl-​ˌȯg, -​ˌäg \

Medical Definition of analogue 

1 : something that is analogous or similar to something else

2 : an organ similar in function to an organ of another animal or plant but different in structure and origin

3 usually analog : a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but differs slightly in composition (as in the replacement of one atom by an atom of a different element or in the presence of a particular functional group)

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More from Merriam-Webster on analogue

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with analogue

Britannica English: Translation of analogue for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about analogue

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