analogue

noun
an·​a·​logue | \ ˈa-nə-ˌlȯg How to pronounce analogue (audio) , -ˌläg\
variants: or

Definition of analogue

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something that is similar or comparable to something else either in general or in some specific detail : something that is analogous to something else historical analogues to the current situation an aspirin analogue
2 : an organ or part similar in function to an organ or part of another animal or plant but different in structure and origin The gill of a fish is the analogue of the lung of a cat.
3 usually analog : a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but differs slightly in composition (as in the replacement of one atom by an atom of a different element or in the presence of a particular functional group)
4 : a food product made by combining a less expensive food (such as soybeans or whitefish) with additives to give the appearance and taste of a more expensive food (such as beef or crab)

analogue

an·​a·​logue

Definition of analogue (Entry 2 of 2)

chiefly British spelling of

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Did You Know?

Noun

The word analogue entered English from French in the 19th century and ultimately traces back to the Greek word logos, meaning "ratio." (The word analogy, which has been a part of English since the 15th century, also descends from logos.) The noun analogue is sometimes spelled analog, particularly when it refers to a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but slightly different in composition. Adding to the confusion, there is also an adjective spelled analog, which came into use in the 20th century. The adjective can refer to something that is analogous (as in an analog organ), but it is most often used to distinguish analog electronics from digital electronics (as in an analog computer or an analog clock).

Examples of analogue in a Sentence

Noun

a modern analog to what happened before the synthetic analog of a chemical found in a tropical tree a meat analogue such as tofu
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Part of the reason, according to experts who study the topic, is there is no analogue to federal laws that criminalize support for foreign terror groups. Tim Fernholz, Quartz, "America’s mass shootings are a political choice," 6 Aug. 2019 The idea here is that the world above the water has some bizarre analogues to life below it; every fish has a doppelgänger. Allegra Frank, Vox, "SpongeBob SquarePants becomes human in his big birthday special. Almost.," 2 July 2019 Before the order, there were new analogues being discovered on a monthly basis. Clare Hymes, CBS News, "DOJ pushes Congress to permanently close loophole for knock-off fentanyl," 2 July 2019 Walker is the closest basketball analogue to Irving. Rob Mahoney, SI.com, "Kemba Walker Isn't Kyrie Irving, and Maybe That's a Good Thing for the Celtics," 30 June 2019 Unlike most matters of global political significance, there is no direct historical analogue for our situation—the unprecedented nature of the crisis is part of its horror. Nathaniel Rich, Harper's magazine, "Ruina Mundi," 10 May 2019 The latter two are known as fentanyl analogues, or derivations from the traditional chemical makeup of fentanyl. Phil Davis, baltimoresun.com, "Drug dealer who called 911 after buyer fatally overdosed in home sentenced to 15 years in prison," 16 Aug. 2019 Even casual comic-book readers will see The Seven as an obvious analogue of DC's Justice League. Peter Rubin, WIRED, "Amazon's The Boys Tests the Limits of Superhero Fatigue," 26 July 2019 This raised the prospect of testing Hawking’s math by analogy, initiating a race to create black hole analogues in the lab. Natalie Wolchover, WIRED, "A ‘Sonic Black Hole' Could Help Solve a Cosmic Paradox," 30 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'analogue.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of analogue

Noun

1804, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for analogue

Noun

French analogue, from analogue analogous, from Greek analogos — see analogous

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Last Updated

2 Sep 2019

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Time Traveler for analogue

The first known use of analogue was in 1804

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More Definitions for analogue

analogue

noun

English Language Learners Definition of analogue

formal : something that is similar to something else in design, origin, use, etc. : something that is analogous to something else

analogue

noun
an·​a·​logue
variants: or analog \ ˈan-​ᵊl-​ˌȯg, -​ˌäg How to pronounce analog (audio) \

Medical Definition of analogue

1 : something that is analogous or similar to something else
2 : an organ similar in function to an organ of another animal or plant but different in structure and origin
3 usually analog : a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but differs slightly in composition (as in the replacement of one atom by an atom of a different element or in the presence of a particular functional group)

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More from Merriam-Webster on analogue

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with analogue

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for analogue

Britannica English: Translation of analogue for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about analogue

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