analogue

noun
an·​a·​logue | \ ˈa-nə-ˌlȯg How to pronounce analogue (audio) , -ˌläg \
variants: or

Definition of analogue

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something that is similar or comparable to something else either in general or in some specific detail : something that is analogous to something else historical analogues to the current situation an aspirin analogue
2 : an organ or part similar in function to an organ or part of another animal or plant but different in structure and origin The gill of a fish is the analogue of the lung of a cat.
3 usually analog : a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but differs slightly in composition (as in the replacement of one atom by an atom of a different element or in the presence of a particular functional group)
4 : a food product made by combining a less expensive food (such as soybeans or whitefish) with additives to give the appearance and taste of a more expensive food (such as beef or crab)

analogue

an·​a·​logue

Definition of analogue (Entry 2 of 2)

chiefly British spelling of

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Noun

The word analogue entered English from French in the 19th century and ultimately traces back to the Greek word logos, meaning "ratio." (The word analogy, which has been a part of English since the 15th century, also descends from logos.) The noun analogue is sometimes spelled analog, particularly when it refers to a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but slightly different in composition. Adding to the confusion, there is also an adjective spelled analog, which came into use in the 20th century. The adjective can refer to something that is analogous (as in an analog organ), but it is most often used to distinguish analog electronics from digital electronics (as in an analog computer or an analog clock).

Examples of analogue in a Sentence

Noun a modern analog to what happened before the synthetic analog of a chemical found in a tropical tree a meat analogue such as tofu
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun It’s just one example of how a murky arithmetic question acquires a visual meaning once converted into its analogue for polynomials. Quanta Magazine, 19 July 2021 Maybe the closest thing pop-punk has to a Limp Bizkit analogue, Good Charlotte were also massive hitmakers not taken terribly seriously at the time by purists or critics, especially as their hits got bigger and poppier. Andrew Unterberger, Billboard, 2 Aug. 2021 European car maker Stellantis, meanwhile, has resorted to installing analogue speedometers on its Peugeot 308 model to save on chips and will even offer a €400 discount for what some might consider a cool, retro twist. Spencer Jakab, WSJ, 23 Apr. 2021 Perhaps the closest analogue to the Kelly case, according to one expert, was the successful RICO prosecution of the upstate New York group Nxivm, a cultlike organization that purported to be a self-help group. Megan Crepeau, chicagotribune.com, 6 Aug. 2021 The Bryan-Wilson dynamic is a useful analogue for the modern conservative moment. Sean-michael Pigeon, National Review, 9 July 2021 Harvey assured Erb that the lab was making an assumption about the unknown element being a drug analogue. Matthew Hongoltz-hetling, The New Republic, 23 June 2021 And given that Jeff Bezos’s closest cultural analogue is an actual cartoon villain—Lex Luthor, CEO of LexCorp and Superman’s bald nemesis—the tactic felt inevitable in this case. Daniel Brook, Harper's Magazine, 22 June 2021 But at least one way its still alive is with analogue photography. Nadja Sayej, Forbes, 20 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'analogue.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of analogue

Noun

1804, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for analogue

Noun

borrowed from French, borrowed from Greek análogon "proportion, correspondence," noun derivative from neuter of análogos "proportionate, analogous"

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Time Traveler for analogue

Time Traveler

The first known use of analogue was in 1804

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Dictionary Entries Near analogue

analogous pole

analogue

analogue computer

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Last Updated

10 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Analogue.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/analogue. Accessed 18 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for analogue

analogue

noun

English Language Learners Definition of analogue

: something that is similar to something else in design, origin, use, etc. : something that is analogous to something else

analogue

noun
an·​a·​logue
variants: or analog \ ˈan-​ᵊl-​ˌȯg, -​ˌäg How to pronounce analogue (audio) \

Medical Definition of analogue

1 : something that is analogous or similar to something else
2 : an organ similar in function to an organ of another animal or plant but different in structure and origin
3 usually analog : a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but differs slightly in composition (as in the replacement of one atom by an atom of a different element or in the presence of a particular functional group)

More from Merriam-Webster on analogue

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for analogue

Britannica English: Translation of analogue for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about analogue

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