analogue

noun
an·​a·​logue | \ ˈa-nə-ˌlȯg How to pronounce analogue (audio) , -ˌläg \
variants: or

Definition of analogue

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : something that is similar or comparable to something else either in general or in some specific detail : something that is analogous to something else historical analogues to the current situation an aspirin analogue
2 : an organ or part similar in function to an organ or part of another animal or plant but different in structure and origin The gill of a fish is the analogue of the lung of a cat.
3 usually analog : a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but differs slightly in composition (as in the replacement of one atom by an atom of a different element or in the presence of a particular functional group)
4 : a food product made by combining a less expensive food (such as soybeans or whitefish) with additives to give the appearance and taste of a more expensive food (such as beef or crab)

analogue

an·​a·​logue

Definition of analogue (Entry 2 of 2)

chiefly British spelling of

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Did You Know?

Noun

The word analogue entered English from French in the 19th century and ultimately traces back to the Greek word logos, meaning "ratio." (The word analogy, which has been a part of English since the 15th century, also descends from logos.) The noun analogue is sometimes spelled analog, particularly when it refers to a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but slightly different in composition. Adding to the confusion, there is also an adjective spelled analog, which came into use in the 20th century. The adjective can refer to something that is analogous (as in an analog organ), but it is most often used to distinguish analog electronics from digital electronics (as in an analog computer or an analog clock).

Examples of analogue in a Sentence

Noun a modern analog to what happened before the synthetic analog of a chemical found in a tropical tree a meat analogue such as tofu
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center was their closest American analogue. Will Stephenson, Harper's Magazine, "The Well-Tempered Synthesizer," 15 Sep. 2020 Perhaps the closest analogue for this present American moment is 1965, in Selma, Alabama—where protests led to a swift federal legislative response. Syreeta Mcfadden, The Atlantic, "Where Does Black Lives Matter Go from Here?," 3 Sep. 2020 When suffering an apparent creative block, Pink Floyd labored on something seemingly unrelated — in this case, a tedious process of analogue sound design — to take a break and recover from creative fatigue. Tom Maxwell, Longreads, "Shelved: Pink Floyd’s Household Objects," 3 Sep. 2020 Its flat, unreadable surface is a visual analogue to the theme of the movie: anonymous corporate power behind unreadable facades plotting unanswerable schemes. Kyle Smith, National Review, "The Political Noir for the Age of Assassination," 14 Aug. 2020 Their closest analogue is rapid dengue-virus tests, used in India, which are manufactured in a quantity of 100 million a year. Robinson Meyer, The Atlantic, "The Way Out," 14 Aug. 2020 There's no denying that when measured this way, the automatic 992 is superior to its manual analogue. Mike Sutton, Car and Driver, "The Magnificent Seven: 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S Manual," 5 Aug. 2020 The ergonomics feel sound, but the interior design is showing its age, most notably the large analogue tachometer and speedometer. Jonathan M. Gitlin, Ars Technica, "The 2020 VW Golf GTI proves you shouldn’t overcomplicate an icon," 8 June 2020 Aside from the unavoidably analogue showers, locker rooms and protein-powder dispensers, the experience is almost entirely digital. Michael Gold, The Economist, "Postcard from Silicon Valley Will virtual-reality gyms let us work out in the pandemic?," 8 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'analogue.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of analogue

Noun

1804, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for analogue

Noun

borrowed from French, borrowed from Greek análogon "proportion, correspondence," noun derivative from neuter of análogos "proportionate, analogous"

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Time Traveler for analogue

Time Traveler

The first known use of analogue was in 1804

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Last Updated

21 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Analogue.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/analogue. Accessed 21 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for analogue

analogue

noun
How to pronounce analogue (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of analogue

formal : something that is similar to something else in design, origin, use, etc. : something that is analogous to something else

analogue

noun
an·​a·​logue
variants: or analog \ ˈan-​ᵊl-​ˌȯg, -​ˌäg How to pronounce analog (audio) \

Medical Definition of analogue

1 : something that is analogous or similar to something else
2 : an organ similar in function to an organ of another animal or plant but different in structure and origin
3 usually analog : a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but differs slightly in composition (as in the replacement of one atom by an atom of a different element or in the presence of a particular functional group)

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More from Merriam-Webster on analogue

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for analogue

Britannica English: Translation of analogue for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about analogue

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