analogue

1 of 2

noun

an·​a·​logue ˈa-nə-ˌlȯg How to pronounce analogue (audio)
-ˌläg
variants or analog
1
: something that is similar or comparable to something else either in general or in some specific detail : something that is analogous to something else
historical analogues to the current situation
an aspirin analogue
2
: an organ or part similar in function to an organ or part of another animal or plant but different in structure and origin
The gill of a fish is the analogue of the lung of a cat.
3
usually analog : a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but differs slightly in composition (as in the replacement of one atom by an atom of a different element or in the presence of a particular functional group)
4
: a food product made by combining a less expensive food (such as soybeans or whitefish) with additives to give the appearance and taste of a more expensive food (such as beef or crab)

analogue

2 of 2
an·​a·​logue

chiefly British spelling of analog

Did you know?

Analogue is a handy word for something that is similar to something else in design, origin, use, etc., as in “tofu is a meat analogue.” Like its relations analogy and analogous, it traces back ultimately to the Greek word lógos, meaning “word,” “speech,” “relation,” “correspondence,” and “proportion.” Not to get too meta about analogue, but the nouns analogue and analog are themselves analogues (or, ahem, analogs) of one another: they differ only in spelling, though the analogue spelling is more common except in contexts related to chemistry. The pair also function as adjectives—as in “an analog watch” or “analog recording”—but in that case the shorter form is preferred except by those who use British English.

Examples of analogue in a Sentence

Noun a modern analog to what happened before the synthetic analog of a chemical found in a tropical tree a meat analogue such as tofu
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
The museum is an analogue to the Times’ 1619 Project, a sweeping public chronicle of an alternative origin story for our country. Doreen St. Félix, The New Yorker, 25 Mar. 2024 An ancient analogue took place between 360 and 299 million years ago, during the Carboniferous period, when oxygen made up 35 percent of the atmosphere, compared to today’s 21 percent. Max Bennett, Discover Magazine, 11 Mar. 2024 Grande, the former Nickelodeon star with woodwind-like vocal chords, is their analogue in the world of dance-pop. Spencer Kornhaber, The Atlantic, 13 Mar. 2024 There is no left-of-center analogue to these right-leaning sports shows. Kellen Browning, New York Times, 10 Feb. 2024 The closest analogue to the current crisis may be another common Icelandic hazard: avalanches. Robin George Andrews, Scientific American, 13 Feb. 2024 Proper photo booth snaps are a playful souvenir to remember your trip, and luckily, there’s a vintage analogue photo booth just in front of the bucolic Abbesses Garden. Sophie Dodd, Travel + Leisure, 29 Nov. 2023 Starting in 2017, when officials tracked a steep spike in the percentage of cases containing fentanyl or its analogues, 85 percent of all deaths due to opioid use were among Black Washingtonians, data shows. Jenna Portnoy, Washington Post, 1 Feb. 2024 Then, a snippet which pictured JT from behind the stage curtain, thanking an audience over the sound of an old school analogue drum machine and lo-fi organ, lifted from the video’s intro. Gil Kaufman, Billboard, 25 Jan. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'analogue.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun

borrowed from French, borrowed from Greek análogon "proportion, correspondence," noun derivative from neuter of análogos "proportionate, analogous"

First Known Use

Noun

1804, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of analogue was in 1804

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Dictionary Entries Near analogue

Cite this Entry

“Analogue.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/analogue. Accessed 14 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

analogue

noun
an·​a·​logue
variants or analog
ˈan-ᵊl-ˌȯg,
-ˌäg
1
: something that is analogous to something else
2
: an organ or part similar in function to an organ or part of another animal or plant but different in structure and origin
3
: of or relating to an analog computer
4
: being a clock or watch that has hour and minute hands

Medical Definition

analogue

noun
an·​a·​logue
variants or analog
1
: something that is analogous or similar to something else
2
: an organ similar in function to an organ of another animal or plant but different in structure and origin
3
usually analog : a chemical compound that is structurally similar to another but differs slightly in composition (as in the replacement of one atom by an atom of a different element or in the presence of a particular functional group)

More from Merriam-Webster on analogue

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