agarwood

noun

agar·​wood ˈa-gər-ˌwu̇d How to pronounce agarwood (audio)
ˈä-
: the soft, dark heartwood that is produced by any of various southeast Asian evergreen trees (genus Aquilaria, especially A. malaccensis synonym A. agallocha) when they become infected with a fungus and that contains a fragrant resin used chiefly to produce incense, perfumes, and traditional medicines
With prices for noncultivated agarwood rising to $10,000 a kilo, few local shopkeepers welcome mere browsers.Jennifer Gampell

called also aloes, aloeswood, eaglewood

Examples of agarwood in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Official tasting notes describe a sweet and floral palate with spiced sandalwood and agarwood, followed by a long finish with undertones of mizunara. Jonah Flicker, Robb Report, 20 Sep. 2023 The resin, also known as agarwood, forms within aquilaria trees and is one of the most expensive raw materials used in perfumery. Taylore Glynn, Allure, 8 Dec. 2022 Varieties scented with plum, clove and agarwood are also available. Sarah Burchard, Forbes, 9 June 2022 The eau de parfum is anchored by agarwood (oud) and sandalwood to give it a little bit of intensity, making this scent a good option year-round, though the overall freshness is definitely fitting for warm weather. Jihan Forbes, Allure, 20 Apr. 2022 Founded in Kyoto in 1663, this stationary store and incense specialist was the official stationer to the Imperial Family from 1891 to 1945 and stocks a wide variety of calligraphy brushes, washi letter paper and incense coils fragranced with ingredients such as agarwood, jasmine, and pine. Chris Schalkx, Condé Nast Traveler, 20 Jan. 2023 The woodiness of the intense fragrance comes out at the base, which features notes of oud (also known as agarwood), sandalwood, cypriol, and incense. Dallas News, 30 Nov. 2022 The agarwood species Aquilaria sinensis is native to tropical China. Darren Incorvaia, Scientific American, 1 Oct. 2022 As its name suggests, its chief note is the tuberose flower, which is blended with suede accord, patchouli, agarwood musk and Szechuan peppercorn to ground the floral notes in a more earthy cocktail. Kristin Corpuz, The Hollywood Reporter, 22 June 2022

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'agarwood.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

agar- (borrowed from Hindi agar "the tree Aquilaria malaccensis or its wood," going back to Sanskrit aguruḥ, agaruḥ, probably borrowed from a Dravidian source—whence Tamil & Malayalam akil, name for Aquilaria malaccensis) + wood entry 1

First Known Use

1930, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of agarwood was in 1930

Dictionary Entries Near agarwood

Cite this Entry

“Agarwood.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/agarwood. Accessed 27 May. 2024.

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