affluent

adjective
af·​flu·​ent | \ ˈa-(ˌ)flü-ənt also a-ˈflü- or ə- How to pronounce affluent (audio) \

Definition of affluent

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : having an abundance of goods or riches : wealthy affluent families our affluent society
2 : flowing in abundance affluent streams affluent creativity

affluent

noun
af·​flu·​ent | \ ˈa-(ˌ)flü-ənt also a-ˈflü- or ə- How to pronounce affluent (audio) \

Definition of affluent (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a tributary stream … its meandering stream, one of the smaller affluents of the Sacramento.— John Muir
2 [ derivative of 1affluent ] : a wealthy or affluent person The affluents exhibit far less demographic diversity than is exhibited in any of the lower-income segments of the population.— Pamela N. Danzinger

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Other Words from affluent

Adjective

affluently adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for affluent

Adjective

rich, wealthy, affluent, opulent mean having goods, property, and money in abundance. rich implies having more than enough to gratify normal needs or desires. became rich through shrewd investing wealthy stresses the possession of property and intrinsically valuable things. wealthy landowners affluent suggests prosperity and an increasing wealth. an affluent society opulent suggests lavish expenditure and display of great wealth, more often applying to things than people. an opulent mansion

Did You Know?

Adjective

Are your coffers overflowing? Is your cash flow more than adequate? Are your assets fluid? If so, you can consider yourself affluent. Affluent is all about flow—that is to say, it's based on the Latin word for "flow," which is fluere. (Some other fluere descendants are confluence, fluctuate, fluid, influence, mellifluous, and superfluous.) The older sense of affluent refers, both literally and figuratively, to an abundant flow, as in "an affluent fountain" or "affluent joy." The use of "affluent fortune" for an abundant flow of money is what likely led to the use of affluent as a synonym of wealthy.

Examples of affluent in a Sentence

Adjective

The store catered to a mostly affluent clientele that was relatively price insensitive, so we could afford to pay our suppliers a premium for the very best fish. The shop also developed a significant wholesale business, and soon the great and the good of London gastronomy were flocking to our door. — Frances Percival, Saveur, March 2008 A recent crop of books and articles give voice to this complaint. They happen to be written by journalists who are also well-educated and affluent mothers, but when it comes to parental discontent they are not alone. — Barbara Dafoe Whitehead, Commonweal, 16 June 2006 The Bay Area, which encompasses the cities of San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose, as well as surrounding areas, is one of the nation's most affluent regions: More than 40% of the area's residents have annual household income of at least $75,000, versus only 25% in the country's other top 50 markets, according to Scarborough Research. — Eileen Davis Hudson et al., Editor & Publisher, 1 Oct. 2001 His family was more affluent than most. he is affluent and can afford to send his children to the best schools

Noun

the Nipigon and the St. Louis rivers are affluents of Lake Superior
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Some who favor a study of boundaries point to a 2014 county report that cited gaps in student performance between schools populated by students from more affluent families and those with a significant share from low-income families. Washington Post, "School boundary questions touch off debates about race, income, equity," 8 July 2019 Indeed, the fact that affluent families use public libraries is arguably an institutional strength. Matthew Yglesias, Vox, "Democrats’ ongoing argument about free college, explained," 24 June 2019 For some affluent families, bringing home a new baby may involve not just a nanny or two, but also a lactation consultant and a newborn care specialist. Anna Bahney, CNN, "What it takes to be a $200,000-a-year nanny," 13 June 2019 The novel follows two opposing families in Shaker Heights, Ohio: the Richardsons, an affluent family with four children, and the Warrens, a mother-daughter duo who struggle to get by. Glamour, "Little Fires Everywhere," 25 May 2019 Council President Brian Linick said that, with the opiate epidemic occurring both in inner cities and in more affluent suburbs, such a use would not necessarily be a negative. cleveland.com, "Beachwood council delays zoning decision for proposed luxury apartments," 2 July 2019 This falls disproportionately on the less affluent, who often live far away from their jobs and public transport. The Economist, "The environmentCalifornia is a leader on environmentalism," 21 June 2019 As the title implies, wealth management advisors such as Wu work in a realm typically reserved for the very affluent. Matthew Ormseth, latimes.com, "College admissions scandal mastermind found fertile hunting grounds in wealth management world," 21 June 2019 With stratospheric rents and home prices threatening to exile all but the most affluent from San Francisco, officials and advocacy groups agree on one thing: creating affordable housing for low- and middle-income residents is critical. Dominic Fracassa, SFChronicle.com, "SF Mayor London Breed struggles to build consensus with supervisors on housing plan," 16 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The development of seaside resorts like Newport but also Long Branch in New Jersey, catering to the affluent, occasioned near drownings, which inspired the storyline of manly rescue. Brian T. Allen, National Review, "Silver Sailing Cups Recall Gilded Age Glamour and Sexuality," 29 June 2019 One is that kids from affluent families are considerably more likely to attend college than kids from less prosperous backgrounds, so any kind of higher education spending tends to disproportionately benefit the affluent. Matthew Yglesias, Vox, "Democrats’ ongoing argument about free college, explained," 24 June 2019 When school assignment lines are drawn to reinforce that separation, the result is a greater disparity between affluent and lower-income communities, as opposed to within each individual community. Isabella Gomez, Teen Vogue, "Sylvia Mendez Helped Integrate California Schools for Latinx Students in the 1940s, But She Says the U.S. Is More Segregated Now," 3 Dec. 2018 Does anyone believe those retirement benefits won’t be restored eventually, at least for the non-affluent? The Editorial Board, WSJ, "The GOP’s Social Security Raid," 20 Aug. 2018 Democrats in his affluent, Seal Beach-to-Laguna Beach district have been organizing against him for over a year. Jonathan Martin, New York Times, "Democrats Find Relief in California House Race Results," 6 June 2018 The industry could do more to appeal to the moderately affluent, who largely think of life insurers as providers of death benefits rather than savings and retirement products. The Economist, "The life-insurance industry is in need of new vigour," 17 May 2018 That partly reflects the fact that the vast majority of new apartment construction has been at the high end, catering to a growing pool of affluent, professional renters in urban areas. Laura Kusisto, WSJ, "Freddie Mac Offers Cheap Loans to Affordable-Housing Landlords," 3 May 2018 The victory expands the League’s solid dominance in Italy’s affluent north. Washington Post, "Anti-migrant League party wins big in Italian regional vote," 30 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'affluent.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of affluent

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun

1735, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for affluent

Adjective

Middle English, "flowing in abundance, copious," borrowed from Latin affluent-, affluens "flowing with, abundant," present participle of affluere "to flow in, come streaming along, be abundantly present," from ad- ad- + fluere "to flow, run" — more at fluid entry 1

Noun

borrowed from French, borrowed from Latin affluent-, affluens "flowing in" — more at affluent entry 1

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Last Updated

20 Jul 2019

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Time Traveler for affluent

The first known use of affluent was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for affluent

affluent

adjective
af·​flu·​ent | \ ˈa-ˌflü-ənt How to pronounce affluent (audio) \

Kids Definition of affluent

: having plenty of money and expensive things : wealthy an affluent family

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More from Merriam-Webster on affluent

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with affluent

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for affluent

Spanish Central: Translation of affluent

Nglish: Translation of affluent for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of affluent for Arabic Speakers

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