adviser

noun
ad·​vis·​er | \ əd-ˈvī-zər How to pronounce adviser (audio) \
variants: or advisor

Definition of adviser

: someone who gives advice a financial/investment adviser She was not signing on as a domestic or foreign-policy adviser— Peggy Noonan In this meeting, Clifford, who had been a senior Truman aide and an adviser to Kennedy, used George Ball's memorandums in pleading that the war could not be won.— Sidney Blumenthal In December, she and her thesis advisor, Neal Evans, used the camera, attached to a 50-inch telescope, to look for infant stars in a giant molecular cloud in the constellation Orion.— Andrew Chaikin In a real sense, the emperor's astronomical ministers functioned like advisors in a modern president's cabinet, advising him on how best to conduct the affairs of state in a harmonious and effective manner.— Laurence A. Marschall

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What's the difference between adviser and advisor?

Adviser or advisor? It doesn't matter what your computer's spellcheck tells you, adviser and advisor are both correct. Although there is enough overlap between these two words that they are generally considered simply to be different ways to spell the same word, there are some cases in which one tends to be used more often than the other. Some people feel that advisor is more formal, and it tends to be found more often when applied to official positions, such as an advisor to a president. When referring to someone who is serving in a military role, especially when using the term as a euphemism (as when claiming that troops are actually military advisers), then adviser is somewhat more common.

Examples of adviser in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Another national study is underway to determine whether the virus spreads among vaccinated college students, Anthony Fauci, medical adviser to the president, revealed during a White House briefing Friday. Adrianna Rodriguez, USA TODAY, "What can I do if I'm vaccinated against COVID-19, but my child isn't? Here are activities health experts say are safe.," 1 Apr. 2021 Adams noted how people have praised Dr. Anthony Fauci, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases director who served on Trump's coronavirus task force and stayed on to become chief medical adviser to Biden. Jacqueline Howard, CNN, "Former US Surgeon General defends Birx in tweets following CNN special report," 29 Mar. 2021 Fauci is the chief medical adviser to President Joe Biden. Brooke Baitinger, sun-sentinel.com, "Trump launches official website for post-presidency office," 29 Mar. 2021 Some refer to the vaccine as #FauciOuchie, named after Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the chief medical adviser to President Joe Biden. Hannah Herrera Greenspan, chicagotribune.com, "More Illinois residents are eligible for the coronavirus vaccine. Here are some of the best tweets from happy post-vaxxers," 29 Mar. 2021 Cheney, who famously headed Bush's vice presidential search team before recommending himself for the job, perhaps best embodied the role of chief adviser. Will Weissert, Star Tribune, "Vice presidents' policy projects come with political risks," 27 Mar. 2021 On Monday evening, Trump also criticized Anthony Fauci, who heads the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases while acting as President Biden's chief medical adviser. Naomi Lim, Washington Examiner, "Trump fuels speculation of own social media platform in coy interview," 22 Mar. 2021 Reluctance among certain parts of the population to receiving a vaccine is one of the biggest risks to coronavirus control efforts, President Joe Biden’s chief medical adviser said. Christopher Condon, BostonGlobe.com, "Fauci says vaccine hesitancy among Republicans poses a risk: ‘I just don’t get it’," 14 Mar. 2021 On Wednesday, Fauci, President Biden's chief medical adviser, said herd immunity for the virus would likely require 70% to 85% of the population to be vaccinated. Kathryn Watson, CBS News, "Over a third of Republicans don't want the COVID vaccine — and many of them aren't budging," 11 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adviser.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of adviser

circa 1536, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for adviser

advise + -er entry 2, -or entry 1

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Time Traveler for adviser

Time Traveler

The first known use of adviser was circa 1536

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Statistics for adviser

Last Updated

7 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Adviser.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/adviser. Accessed 13 Apr. 2021.

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