adulation

noun
ad·​u·​la·​tion | \ ˌa-jə-ˈlā-shən How to pronounce adulation (audio) , -dyə, -də-\

Definition of adulation

: excessive or slavish admiration or flattery enjoys the adulation of his fans

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Other Words from adulation

adulate \ ˈa-​jə-​ˌlāt How to pronounce adulate (audio) , -​dyə-​ , -​də-​ \ transitive verb
adulator \ ˈa-​jə-​ˌlā-​tər How to pronounce adulator (audio) \ noun
adulatory \ ˈa-​jə-​lə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce adulatory (audio) \ adjective
adulatory crowds

Did You Know?

If "adulation" makes you think of a dog panting after its master, you're on the right etymological track; the word ultimately derives from the Latin verb adulari, meaning "to fawn on" (a sense used specifically of the affectionate behavior of dogs) or "to flatter." "Adulation," which came to us from Latin by way of Old French, can be traced back as far as the 14th century in English. The verb "adulate," the noun "adulator," and the adjective "adulatory" later joined the language.

Examples of adulation in a Sentence

The rugby player enjoyed the adulation of his fans. a writer who inspires adulation in her readers

Recent Examples on the Web

Might Trump have feared that he would be met with protests and then have to watch Obama bask in the adulation of much bigger crowds? Eugene Robinson, The Mercury News, "Robinson: The unhinged presidency," 25 Aug. 2019 Nan Goldin’s pictures of herself and her friends all tangled up in each other, the color shots suffused with adulation and danger. Eryn Loeb, Longreads, "When Friendship Fades But the Images Linger," 9 Aug. 2019 That heady combination explains why stars -- eager for such adulation -- flocked to the company. Brian Lowry, CNN, "'Untouchable' digs into roots of Harvey Weinstein story," 30 Aug. 2019 Ovechkin Against History Ovechkin, the most productive goal-scorer of his era, has been a lightning rod for adulation and excoriation in his career. Andrew Knoll, New York Times, "Stanley Cup Finals Preview: Surprising Teams With the Same Architect," 27 May 2018 Djokovic, who today defeated Federer in the longest men’s singles final ever played at Wimbledon, 7–6 (5), 1–6, 7–6 (4), 4–6, 13–12 (3), has never elicited that same kind of adulation. Kevin Craft, The Atlantic, "Novak Djokovic Is the Greatest Player of the ‘Big Three’," 14 July 2019 And then most of the players will return to duty with their professional clubs in the National Women’s Soccer League for more well-deserved adulation. Mark Goodman, The Denver Post, "Backpass: Is there a path to pro women’s soccer in Colorado?," 12 July 2019 When many teams would have soaked up the adulation and reveled in winning the biggest prize in women's football, the USWNT regarded the aftermath of victory as the perfect platform to drive their fight for equality further forward. Aimee Lewis, CNN, "Women's World Cup: As champions for equality, USWNT to be admired in its fight for lasting change," 7 July 2019 Lennon had once tried to distance himself from the mania and adulation that the Beatles inspired, to debunk the myth of the four lads who changed the world. David Gambacorta, Longreads, "Took You By Surprise: John and Paul’s Lost Reunion," 25 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adulation.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of adulation

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for adulation

Middle English adulacioun "insincere praise, flattery," borrowed from Anglo-French, borrowed from Latin adūlātiōn-, adūlātiō, from adūlārī "to fawn upon (of dogs), praise insincerely" (of uncertain origin) + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of verbal action

Note: On the presumption that it is a denominal verb, Latin adūlārī has been compared with Sanskrit vāla-, vāra- "hair of a horse's tail, horsehair," Lithuanian valaĩ "horse's tail," though this is difficult both semantically and phonetically. More recently, the base of Latin avidus "greedy, eager" has been proposed as a source (see avid), via a prefixed *ad-awido-, syncopated to *ad-audo-, then with the second d dissimilated to l, yielding *adūlo-, "eagerly seeking something, flattering."

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Last Updated

18 Sep 2019

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Time Traveler for adulation

The first known use of adulation was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for adulation

adulation

noun
ad·​u·​la·​tion | \ ˌa-jə-ˈlā-shən How to pronounce adulation (audio) \

Kids Definition of adulation

: very great admiration

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More from Merriam-Webster on adulation

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for adulation

Spanish Central: Translation of adulation

Britannica English: Translation of adulation for Arabic Speakers

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