adulation

noun
ad·​u·​la·​tion | \ ˌa-jə-ˈlā-shən How to pronounce adulation (audio) , -dyə, -də- \

Definition of adulation

: excessive or slavish admiration or flattery enjoys the adulation of his fans

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Other Words from adulation

adulate \ ˈa-​jə-​ˌlāt How to pronounce adulate (audio) , -​dyə-​ , -​də-​ \ transitive verb
adulator \ ˈa-​jə-​ˌlā-​tər How to pronounce adulator (audio) \ noun
adulatory \ ˈa-​jə-​lə-​ˌtȯr-​ē How to pronounce adulatory (audio) \ adjective
adulatory crowds

Did You Know?

If "adulation" makes you think of a dog panting after its master, you're on the right etymological track; the word ultimately derives from the Latin verb adulari, meaning "to fawn on" (a sense used specifically of the affectionate behavior of dogs) or "to flatter." "Adulation," which came to us from Latin by way of Old French, can be traced back as far as the 14th century in English. The verb "adulate," the noun "adulator," and the adjective "adulatory" later joined the language.

Examples of adulation in a Sentence

The rugby player enjoyed the adulation of his fans. a writer who inspires adulation in her readers
Recent Examples on the Web Trump loves the rallies as a chance to deliver his message unfiltered, aides said, and to bask in the adulation of his supporters. David Jackson, USA TODAY, "Donald Trump to host rallies in Florida, Oklahoma, Arizona, North Carolina," 10 June 2020 My time as a basketball writer mirrored Jordan’s career in length if not in terms of championships and worldwide adulation. David Moore, Dallas News, "Margaritas and soaking rain: ‘The Last Dance’ brings back fond Michael Jordan memories for SportsDay’s David Moore," 16 May 2020 And while many doctors are thankful for public displays of appreciation like the 7 p.m. clapping that's erupted nightly in cities across the country, others feel too guilty to appreciate the adulation, said Masood. NBC News, "Hotline manned by psychiatrists helps coronavirus doctors in distress," 28 Apr. 2020 Some of that trust has been corroded over years of Obama adulation, echo chambers, conspiracy mongering, and knee-jerk partisanship. David Harsanyi, National Review, "The Political Media Are Failing America," 26 Mar. 2020 The solemn visit to the airfield was a contrast to the rally, where Trump reveled in his supporters’ adulation and mocked his political rivals. Jordan Fabian, Bloomberg.com, "Trump Says Senate Gave Him ‘Full, Complete’ Acquittal in Trial," 10 Feb. 2020 He is reserved and seems to dislike popular adulation. oregonlive, "President Charles Lindbergh leads a fascist administration in ‘Plot Against America,’ but real Lindy was ‘rather inept’ as politician," 27 Mar. 2020 Growing up in Manchester, N.H., Sandler was almost pathologically well-adjusted, lacking a formative wound of the type that leads people to get up onstage and beg for the adulation of crowds. Jamie Lauren Keiles, New York Times, "Adam Sandler’s Everlasting Shtick," 27 Nov. 2019 But Giants fans reserved much of their adulation for players making their major league debut in San Francisco, mostly notably Juan Marichal, Orlando Cepeda, Willie McCovey and Felipe Alou. Richard Goldstein, New York Times, "Johnny Antonelli, Star Pitcher for the Giants, Dies at 89," 28 Feb. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'adulation.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of adulation

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for adulation

Middle English adulacioun "insincere praise, flattery," borrowed from Anglo-French, borrowed from Latin adūlātiōn-, adūlātiō, from adūlārī "to fawn upon (of dogs), praise insincerely" (of uncertain origin) + -tiōn-, -tiō, suffix of verbal action

Note: On the presumption that it is a denominal verb, Latin adūlārī has been compared with Sanskrit vāla-, vāra- "hair of a horse's tail, horsehair," Lithuanian valaĩ "horse's tail," though this is difficult both semantically and phonetically. More recently, the base of Latin avidus "greedy, eager" has been proposed as a source (see avid), via a prefixed *ad-awido-, syncopated to *ad-audo-, then with the second d dissimilated to l, yielding *adūlo-, "eagerly seeking something, flattering."

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Time Traveler for adulation

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The first known use of adulation was in the 15th century

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Last Updated

23 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Adulation.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/adulation. Accessed 2 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for adulation

adulation

noun
ad·​u·​la·​tion | \ ˌa-jə-ˈlā-shən How to pronounce adulation (audio) \

Kids Definition of adulation

: very great admiration

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More from Merriam-Webster on adulation

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for adulation

Spanish Central: Translation of adulation

Britannica English: Translation of adulation for Arabic Speakers

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