accusatory

adjective
ac·​cu·​sa·​to·​ry | \ə-ˈkyü-zə-ˌtȯr-ē \

Definition of accusatory 

: containing or expressing accusation : accusing an accusatory look

Examples of accusatory in a Sentence

He pointed an accusatory finger at the suspect. The book has a harsh, accusatory tone.

Recent Examples on the Web

That’s the first accusatory question in every budding conspiracy theory about my minor role in the controversy. John Mccain, WSJ, "John McCain: ‘Vladimir Putin Is an Evil Man’," 10 May 2018 Specifically, that kind of anger and accusatory, petty sort of thing. Morgan Enos, Billboard, "Okkervil River on Autobiographical Song 'Famous Tracheotomies': 'There's Certainly a Gratitude for Being Alive'," 16 Apr. 2018 There have been few steps past the accusatory stage for those who have been revealed to be abusers. Jaya Saxena, GQ, "The Problem with Redemption," 15 June 2018 Turner, for his part, stressed that his intent in sending the letter was not to be accusatory or confrontational, and repeatedly called the governor a good partner in the recovery. Mike Morris, San Antonio Express-News, "Abbott criticizes Houston’s Harvey response," 18 May 2018 The accusatory court filing is the latest in a string of unexpected developments in the case. Keri Blakinger, Houston Chronicle, "Ex-death row inmate Alfred Brown 'bluffed his way out of prison,' county alleges," 9 May 2018 People with legitimate but not immediately visible disabilities get accusatory notes left on their cars, or are conspicuously photographed by apparently suspicious strangers in parking lots. New York Times, "When a Colleague Takes a Parking Space for People With Disabilities," 4 May 2018 Researchers have found that coming across as empathetic causes interrogation targets to open up more than when the interrogator is cold and accusatory. Roni Jacobson, Scientific American, "How to Extract a Confession...Ethically," 1 May 2015 Constand, who waited a year to alert authorities and exchanged dozens of calls with Cosby after the alleged assault, was hammered by Mesereau with accusatory questions about those decisions. Manuel Roig-franzia, Washington Post, "Bill Cosby convicted on three counts of sexual assault," 26 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'accusatory.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of accusatory

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for accusatory

borrowed from Latin accūsātōrius "of a prosecutor, denunciatory," from accūsātor "prosecutor, accuser" (from accūsāre "to call to account, accuse" + -tor, agent suffix) + -ius, adjective suffix

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The first known use of accusatory was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for accusatory

accusatory

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of accusatory

: accusing or blaming someone : assigning blame or fault

accusatory

adjective
ac·​cus·​a·​to·​ry | \ə-ˈkyü-zə-ˌtōr-ē \

Legal Definition of accusatory 

1 : containing or expressing an accusation the accusatory pleading

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More from Merriam-Webster on accusatory

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with accusatory

Spanish Central: Translation of accusatory

Nglish: Translation of accusatory for Spanish Speakers

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