accelerometer

noun
ac·​cel·​er·​om·​e·​ter | \ ik-ˌse-lə-ˈrä-mə-tər How to pronounce accelerometer (audio) , ak- \

Definition of accelerometer

: an instrument for measuring acceleration or for detecting and measuring vibrations

Examples of accelerometer in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The participants wore devices called accelerometers, which continuously measured their activity during the day. Perri Klass, New York Times, "The Benefits of Exercise for Children’s Mental Health," 2 Mar. 2020 For at least 10 hours each day, accelerometers recorded whether the child moved or was sedentary. Sandee Lamotte, CNN, "Keep your teen moving to reduce risk of depression, study says," 11 Feb. 2020 These sensors could be anything that collects data, like a camera inside a smart refrigerator or an accelerometer that tracks speed in a smart running shoe. Arielle Pardes, Wired, "The WIRED Guide to the Internet of Things," 10 Feb. 2020 Base versions come standard with GM's fourth-generation magnetorheological dampers that control the wheels and the body better than before, thanks to the additional feedback from accelerometers at each corner. Tony Quiroga, Car and Driver, "Cadillac's New CT5-V Needs a Different Name," 25 Feb. 2020 Participants were asked to wear accelerometers on their hips for seven days at a time to measure the amount and intensity of their physical activity. Dr. Yalda Safai, ABC News, "Lack of activity in kids may predict depression in adulthood: Study," 12 Feb. 2020 In particular, accelerometers in the tags could record the sudden changes of speed, such as lunging movements, that are associated with predatory behaviours. The Economist, "How cetaceans got so large," 14 Dec. 2019 And Chevy has upgraded those sensors too, changing from simple mechanical position sensors to accelerometers mounted at each corner. Dan Carney, Popular Science, "The Corvette is finally the supercar it deserves to be," 2 Jan. 2020 The commands controlled iOS functions for the keychain, iCloud connections, Apple Watch accelerometer data, iOS permissions, and other iOS features or services. Dan Goodin, Ars Technica, "Advanced mobile surveillanceware, made in Russia, found in the wild," 24 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'accelerometer.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of accelerometer

1875, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for accelerometer

borrowed from French accéléromètre, from accélérer "to accelerate" (borrowed from Latin accelerāre) + -o- -o- + -mètre -meter

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Time Traveler for accelerometer

Time Traveler

The first known use of accelerometer was in 1875

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Statistics for accelerometer

Last Updated

24 Mar 2020

Cite this Entry

“Accelerometer.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/accelerometer. Accessed 28 Mar. 2020.

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More Definitions for accelerometer

accelerometer

noun
ac·​cel·​er·​om·​e·​ter | \ ik-ˌsel-ə-ˈräm-ət-ər, ak- How to pronounce accelerometer (audio) \

Medical Definition of accelerometer

: an instrument for measuring acceleration or for detecting and measuring vibrations

More from Merriam-Webster on accelerometer

Nglish: Translation of accelerometer for Spanish Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about accelerometer

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