accelerate

verb
ac·​cel·​er·​ate | \ ik-ˈse-lə-ˌrāt How to pronounce accelerate (audio) , ak-\
accelerated; accelerating

Definition of accelerate

intransitive verb

1 : to move faster : to gain speed The car slowly accelerated. The pace of change has accelerated in recent months.
2 : to progress from grade to grade more rapidly than usual : to follow a speeded-up educational program

transitive verb

1 : to bring about at an earlier time Circumstances accelerated their departure.
2 : to cause to move faster accelerated his steps also : to cause to undergo acceleration
3a : to hasten the progress or development of accelerate our efforts
b : increase accelerate food production
4a : to enable (a student) to complete a course in less than usual time
b : to speed up (something, such as a course of study)

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Examples of accelerate in a Sentence

She stepped on the gas and the car accelerated. The plane accelerated down the runway. She stepped on the gas and accelerated the car. He says that cutting taxes will help to accelerate economic growth. The rate of economic growth has continued to accelerate.
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Recent Examples on the Web

But settlement approvals have accelerated in east Jerusalem and the West Bank since Trump took office, as Israel has encountered little if any resistance from a friendly White House. Washington Post, "New data shows Israeli settlement surge in east Jerusalem," 12 Sep. 2019 Miami's rebuild that has started under first-year coach Brian Flores was unexpectedly accelerated over the weekend with three separate deals involving starters Laremy Tunsil, Kiko Alonso and Kenny Stills. Si Wire, SI.com, "Ravens vs. Dolphins Live Stream: Watch Online, TV Channel, Start Time," 8 Sep. 2019 The push for revisions to the state’s charter law was accelerated by recent charter scandals and investigative reporting, including by The Times. Howard Blumestaff Writer, Los Angeles Times, "Charter school compromise could intensify L.A.'s school board battles," 3 Sep. 2019 The erosion of democratic norms, which predates Donald Trump and has been exponentially accelerated by his Administration, is incremental. Sue Halpern, The New Yorker, "Filling the Empty Seats at the F.E.C. Won’t Fix America’s Corrupt Elections," 29 Aug. 2019 That goal was accelerated last week, when Nix was coronated as the Tigers’ starting quarterback for their season opener. Tom Green | Tgreen@al.com, oregonlive, "Freshman Orientation: Auburn’s Bo Nix the latest in trend of true freshman starting quarterbacks," 26 Aug. 2019 But in recent years, the pace has noticeably accelerated because of the proliferation of cable networks and new streaming services hungry for content. Radhika Marya, Fortune, "Show Swapping Is TV’s New Star," 26 Aug. 2019 Deforestation has accelerated in the Amazon since Brazil’s far-right President Jair Bolsonaro took office in January. Jill Langlois, The New Republic, "The Small Business Solution to Saving the Amazon," 22 Aug. 2019 The trend of builders trying to provide more homes that first-time buyers can afford has only accelerated. Aldo Svaldi, The Denver Post, "New home construction keeps falling in metro Denver," 21 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'accelerate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of accelerate

circa 1522, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for accelerate

borrowed from Latin accelerātus, past participle of accelerāre "to add speed to, hasten the occurrence of, go quickly," from ad- ad- + celerāre "to hasten," verbal derivative of celer "swift, speedy," perhaps going back to *keli-li-/ri-, derivative from the Indo-European base of Greek kélomai, kelésthai "urge, exhort," kelēt-, kélēs "swift horse, charger"

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Learn More about accelerate

Statistics for accelerate

Last Updated

17 Sep 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for accelerate

The first known use of accelerate was circa 1522

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More Definitions for accelerate

accelerate

verb
ac·​cel·​er·​ate | \ ak-ˈse-lə-ˌrāt How to pronounce accelerate (audio) \
accelerated; accelerating

Kids Definition of accelerate

1 : to move or cause to move faster The car accelerated going downhill.
2 : to cause to happen more quickly Using plant food accelerates growth.

accelerate

verb
ac·​cel·​er·​ate | \ ik-ˈsel-ə-ˌrāt, ak- How to pronounce accelerate (audio) \
accelerated; accelerating

Medical Definition of accelerate

transitive verb

: to cause to move faster or speed up accelerated speech and motor activity in manic patients also : to cause to undergo acceleration

intransitive verb

: to move faster : gain speed

accelerate

verb
ac·​cel·​er·​ate
accelerated; accelerating

Legal Definition of accelerate

transitive verb

: to bring about at an earlier time: as
a : to advance (the maturity date of a security agreement) so that payment of the debt in full is due immediately — see also acceleration clause
b : to cause (a future interest in property) to vest by removing the preceding interests (as by failure or premature termination)

intransitive verb

: to enforce an acceleration clause held that the creditor's right to accelerate was suspended— J. J. White and R. S. Summers

Other Words from accelerate

acceleration noun

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Comments on accelerate

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