tenure

noun
ten·​ure | \ ˈten-yər also -ˌyu̇r How to pronounce tenure (audio) \

Definition of tenure

1 : the act, right, manner, or term of holding something (such as a landed property, a position, or an office) especially : a status granted after a trial period to a teacher that gives protection from summary dismissal
2 : grasp, hold

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Other Words from tenure

tenurable \ ˈten-​yər-​ə-​bəl How to pronounce tenurable (audio) \ adjective
tenurial \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​əl How to pronounce tenurial (audio) \ adjective
tenurially \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​ə-​lē How to pronounce tenurially (audio) \ adverb

Synonyms for tenure

Synonyms

hitch, stint, term, tour

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Examples of tenure in a Sentence

… but there is also about it just the trace of the nettlesome righteousness that alienated much of Washington during his tenure there, the not-so-subtle suggestion that while he might be in politics, he is not of politics and certainly not, God_forbid, a politician. — Jim Wooten, New York Times Magazine, 29 Jan. 1995 Pittsburgh's offensive linemen, trap blockers during Noll's tenure, had to bulk up for the straight-ahead game. — Paul Zimmerman, Sports Illustrated, 9 Nov. 1992 A mural on the upper half of a four-story guesthouse was painted in 1977 by twelve-year-old schoolchildren, whose tenure on the scaffold must have thrilled their parents. — John McPhee, New Yorker, 22 Feb. 1988 During his tenure as head coach, the team won the championship twice. her 12-year tenure with the company His tenure in office will end with the next election. After seven years I was finally granted tenure. He hopes to get tenure next year. The defendant did not have tenure on the land. land tenure in Anglo-Saxon Britain
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Recent Examples on the Web

Human rights groups like the ACLU say civilians — including children — have been killed during the strikes over the years, including during Obama’s tenure. Emily Bloch, Teen Vogue, "The Trump Administration Is Waging a Drone War in Somalia With Increased Air Strikes," 12 Mar. 2019 The end of Foy and Smith's tenure on the show was marred by controversy after executive producer Suzanne Mackie revealed he was paid more than her for the show despite her demonstrably larger role. Emma Dibdin, Harper's BAZAAR, "Here's Your First Look ar The Crown's New Prince Philip," 28 Aug. 2018 Karl Lagerfeld held a prolific tenure at the helm of Chanel from 1983 to his final days in 2019. Erica Gonzales, Harper's BAZAAR, "Meet Virginie Viard, Karl Lagerfeld's Successor at Chanel," 19 Feb. 2019 Chicago Democrat Michael Madigan took the gavel last week for his 18th term as House speaker, a tenure covering all but two years since 1983. John O'connor, The Seattle Times, "Gov. Pritzker gives Democrats near-record power in Illinois," 14 Jan. 2019 Despite such a historic run, many people have feared that RBG's tenure might come to an end soon. Julyssa Lopez, Glamour, "Watch Ruth Bader Ginsburg Get Sworn in to the Supreme Court on Her 25th Anniversary," 10 Aug. 2018 The move ends Ronaldo’s nearly decade-long tenure with Real Madrid, which started in 2008 when he was transferred from England’s Manchester United. Jason Duaine Hahn, PEOPLE.com, "Cristiano Ronaldo Is Leaving Real Madrid After 9 Seasons: 'A New Stage in My Life'," 10 July 2018 The British Columbia government just opted to renew farming tenures for Pacific fish farms. Ahalya Srikant, WIRED, "Photo of the Week: Taking to the Sky to End Open-Water Salmon Farms," 9 July 2018 Chef Richard Knights tenure at Harold's Restaurant & Tap Room was most notable perhaps for its brevity. Houston Chronicle, "Harold’s gets new executive chef," 9 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tenure.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tenure

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for tenure

Middle English, from Anglo-French teneure, tenure, from Medieval Latin tenitura, from Vulgar Latin *tenitus, past participle of Latin tenēre to hold — more at thin

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Statistics for tenure

Last Updated

17 Mar 2019

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Time Traveler for tenure

The first known use of tenure was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for tenure

tenure

noun

English Language Learners Definition of tenure

: the amount of time that a person holds a job, office, or title
: the right to keep a job (especially the job of being a professor at a college or university) for as long as you want to have it
law : the right to use property

tenure

noun
ten·​ure | \ ˈten-yər How to pronounce tenure (audio) \

Legal Definition of tenure

1 : the act, manner, duration, or right of holding something tenure of office specifically : the manner of holding real property : the title and conditions by which property is held freehold tenure
2 : a status granted to a teacher usually after a probationary period that protects him or her from dismissal except for reasons of incompetence, gross misconduct, or financial necessity

Other Words from tenure

tenurial \ te-​ˈnyu̇r-​ē-​əl How to pronounce tenurial (audio) \ adjective
tenurially \ -​ə-​lē How to pronounce tenurially (audio) \ adverb

History and Etymology for tenure

Anglo-French, feudal holding, from Old French teneüre, from Medieval Latin tenitura, ultimately from Latin tenēre to hold

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More from Merriam-Webster on tenure

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with tenure

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tenure

Spanish Central: Translation of tenure

Nglish: Translation of tenure for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tenure for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about tenure

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