chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a historical account of events arranged in order of time usually without analysis or interpretation a chronicle of the Civil War
2 : narrative sense 1 a chronicle of the struggle against drug traffickers

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling\ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to present a record of in or as if in a chronicle chronicle Victorian society chronicle the doings of the rich and famous

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Other Words from chronicle

Verb

chronicler \ ˈkrä-​ni-​k(ə-​)lər How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \ noun

Examples of chronicle in a Sentence

Noun a chronicle of the American Civil War a chronicle of the President's years in office Verb The book chronicles the events that led to the American Civil War. She intends to chronicle the broad social changes that have occurred in this part of the country. a magazine that chronicles the lives of the rich and famous
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The result is a painstakingly detailed, long-overdue chronicle of the attempts by the smaller Axis power to play an outsize — and unrealistically ambitious — role in the global conflict. Washington Post, "World War II’s less-famous fascist," 31 Dec. 2020 Royal biographies tend to fall into two categories: reverent, the subject’s imperfections whitewashed; or waspish, a chronicle of backstairs gossip. Moira Hodgson, WSJ, "‘Prince Philip Revealed’ Review: Ever at Her Side," 4 Dec. 2020 The videos, a chronicle intended for an absent husband and father, are limned with intimate glances and resonant moments of unguarded emotion. Steve Dollar, Los Angeles Times, "A fight against the justice system gets deeply emotional in ‘Time’," 4 Jan. 2021 Featuring Smiley in a supporting role, this bleak chronicle of a British agent manipulated into a fatal East Berlin mission changed forever how readers perceived the real world of those who spy and are spied upon. Tom Nolan, WSJ, "Appreciation: John le Carré, 1931-2020," 24 Dec. 2020 The dossier was a detailed chronicle of Pavlou’s social media behavior. Los Angeles Times, "An Australian student denounced his university’s ties to China. Then he became a target," 21 Dec. 2020 The chronicle that results, as Mitenbuler explains in a prefatory note, also appears at a moment when, for the first time in the history of the form, everything is available. Adam Gopnik, The New Yorker, "The Mixed-Up Masters of Early Animation," 21 Dec. 2020 Nevertheless, the book stands as a chronicle of the nation’s food for the arc of the 20th century. New York Times, "A Deeper, Darker Look at James Beard, Food Oracle and Gay Man," 15 Dec. 2020 Those themes aren't exactly the bedrock of top 40 magic, yet open-minded popheads would be hard-pressed to find anything in the alt realm that's more irresistibly melodic and worthy of repeat listens than this dark, thoughtful chronicle. Billboard Staff, Billboard, "The 25 Best Pop Albums of 2020: Staff Picks," 14 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The Commodity Futures Trading Commission review, which could be released as soon as next week, will chronicle the day’s unusual market dynamics and its trading flows, said the people. Benjamin Bain, Bloomberg.com, "U.S. Oil-Crash Study to Avoid Blaming Traders as Probe Continues," 20 Nov. 2020 Newspapers, archival journal entries from European and American explorers, and oral histories from Indigenous peoples, including the Ahma Mutsun band of the Ohlone, also chronicle a history of the region steeped in fire. Los Angeles Times, "Scarred by fire, California’s first state park remains closed. Can Big Basin recover?," 11 Nov. 2020 The Series, the show will chronicle the late Tejano singer’s family life, relationships, and rise to fame. Christopher Rosa, Glamour, "The Selena Netflix Series: Here’s How Much the Cast Looks Like Their IRL Counterparts," 27 Oct. 2020 Although there is no surviving footage of the performance, it was documented in Roderick Young’s photographs, which chronicle a remarkable moment of Black art in Los Angeles in the 1970s. Lovia Gyarkye, New York Times, "An Artist’s Continuing Exploration of the Human Form," 9 Nov. 2020 But our stories chronicle disturbing shortcomings in the promise of help offered by the state’s Division of Developmental Disabilities. State Of Denial, ProPublica, "Editors’ Note: Why We Investigated the Treatment of People With Developmental Disabilities," 6 Nov. 2020 The quest for back-to-back World Series titles begins now, and Dodgers Dugout will be around to chronicle it. Houston Mitchell Assistant Sports Editor, Los Angeles Times, "Dodgers Dugout: What will the team look like in 2021?," 3 Nov. 2020 Federal authorities also used an unverified dossier, purporting to chronicle Trump's past activities in Moscow, to support the warrant application. Kevin Johnson, USA TODAY, "'We did our job': Former deputy FBI chief Andrew McCabe to defend Russia investigation," 8 July 2016 Frampton does chronicle his struggles with substance abuse and depression, as well as a mid-career malaise. Gary Graff, cleveland, "Peter Frampton’s rock ‘n’ roll life comes alive in pages of new memoir," 18 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chronicle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of chronicle

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for chronicle

Noun

Middle English cronycle, borrowed from Anglo-French cronike, cronicle (-le perhaps by assimilation to words with the suffix -icle, as article article entry 1), borrowed from Latin chronica "book of annals," borrowed from Greek () chroniká, (hai) chronikaí, from plural of chronikós "of time, temporal, in order by time" (with a noun such as biblía "books" or graphaí "writings" understood) — more at chronic

Verb

Middle English cronyclen, verbal derivative of cronycle chronicle entry 1

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Time Traveler for chronicle

Time Traveler

The first known use of chronicle was in the 14th century

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Statistics for chronicle

Last Updated

18 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Chronicle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chronicle. Accessed 18 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for chronicle

chronicle

noun
How to pronounce chronicle (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a description of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

verb

English Language Learners Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to describe a series of events in the order that they happened

chronicle

noun
chron·​i·​cle | \ ˈkrä-ni-kəl How to pronounce chronicle (audio) \

Kids Definition of chronicle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an account of events in the order that they happened : history

chronicle

verb
chronicled; chronicling

Kids Definition of chronicle (Entry 2 of 2)

: to record in the order of occurrence This chapter chronicles the events leading to the American Revolution.

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Comments on chronicle

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