Celtic

1 of 2

adjective

Celt·​ic ˈkel-tik How to pronounce Celtic (audio) ˈsel- How to pronounce Celtic (audio)
: of, relating to, or characteristic of the Celts or their languages
Celtic music
Celtic folklore

Celtic

2 of 2

noun

: a group of Indo-European languages usually subdivided into Brythonic and Goidelic and now largely confined to Brittany, Wales, Ireland, and the Scottish Highlands see Indo-European Languages Table

Examples of Celtic in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Adjective
The Book of Kells exhibit, an illuminated manuscript created by Celtic monks in about 800 AD that draws tourists to campus, was closed. Jeanine Santucci, USA TODAY, 4 May 2024 Across concert posters and LP sleeves, many of which the Museum of Modern Art now holds, her designs combined Celtic complexity, Arabic curvatures and a ritualized numerical precision uncommon even for the baroque 1960s. Walker Mimms, New York Times, 17 Apr. 2024 The spa is based around the ancient Celtic reverence for nature and comes with an indoor-outdoor swimming pool, a Wyda room (a Celtish form of yoga practised here), and ‘silence’ rooms. Jemima Sissons, Condé Nast Traveler, 9 Apr. 2024 The celebration featured Irish, Celtic, cover, and tribute bands, traditional Irish dancing, free shenanigan games, green and craft beers, local food and more. U-T Staff, San Diego Union-Tribune, 4 Apr. 2024 The Gallic people, also known as the Gauls, were a Celtic people who occupied parts of modern-day France, Belgium, Germany and Italy and lived in agricultural societies divided into tribes, according to Britannica. Irene Wright, Miami Herald, 2 Apr. 2024 Although its origin is unknown, the custom dates back to Roman-British and Celtic mythology. Samantha Murphy Kelly, CNN, 30 Mar. 2024 In Randall’s view, the impossible-to-define origins of country music center on three forms: Celtic ballad storytelling, African influences and evangelical Christianity. Maria Sherman, Fortune, 29 Mar. 2024 Still, some spiritual doubles were worse warnings than others, with the German and Celtic traditions supposing that the appearance of a lookalike was a sign of impending doom, death, or sickness. Sam Walters, Discover Magazine, 19 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'Celtic.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

Adjective

circa 1530, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1658, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of Celtic was circa 1530

Dictionary Entries Near Celtic

Cite this Entry

“Celtic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Celtic. Accessed 19 May. 2024.

Kids Definition

Celtic

1 of 2 adjective
Celt·​ic ˈkel-tik How to pronounce Celtic (audio) ˈsel- How to pronounce Celtic (audio)
: of, relating to, or characteristic of the Celts or their languages

Celtic

2 of 2 noun
: a group of languages including Gaelic and Welsh
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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