temperament

3 ENTRIES FOUND:

tem·per·a·ment

noun \ˈtem-p(ə-)rə-mənt, -pər-mənt\

: the usual attitude, mood, or behavior of a person or animal

Full Definition of TEMPERAMENT

1
obsolete
a :  constitution of a substance, body, or organism with respect to the mixture or balance of its elements, qualities, or parts :  makeup
b :  complexion 1
2
obsolete
a :  climate
b :  temperature 2
3
a :  the peculiar or distinguishing mental or physical character determined by the relative proportions of the humors according to medieval physiology
b :  characteristic or habitual inclination or mode of emotional response <a nervous temperament>
c :  extremely high sensibility; especially :  excessive sensitiveness or irritability
4
a :  the act or process of tempering or modifying :  adjustment, compromise
b :  middle course :  mean
5
:  the slight modification of acoustically pure intervals in tuning a musical instrument; especially :  modification that produces a set of 12 equally spaced tones to the octave

Examples of TEMPERAMENT

  1. The two women were opposite in temperament.
  2. <looking for a dog with a sweet temperament>

Origin of TEMPERAMENT

Middle English, from Latin temperamentum, from temperare to mix, temper
First Known Use: 15th century

Other Psychology Terms

fetish, hypochondria, intelligence, mania, narcissism, neurosis, pathological, psychosis, schadenfreude, subliminal

tem·per·a·ment

noun \ˈtem-p(ə-)rə-mənt, -pər-mənt\   (Medical Dictionary)

Medical Definition of TEMPERAMENT

1
: the peculiar or distinguishing mental or physical character determined by the relative proportions of the humors according to medieval physiology
2
: characteristic or habitual inclination or mode of emotional response <a nervous temperament>

temperament

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

In the psychological study of personality, an individual's characteristic or habitual inclination or mode of emotional response. The notion of temperament in this sense originated with Galen, who developed it from an earlier theory regarding the four “humours”: blood, phlegm, and black and yellow bile. The subject was taken up in the 20th century by Ernst Kretschmer and later theorists, including Margaret Mead. Today researchers emphasize physiological processes (including the endocrine and autonomic nervous systems) and culture and learning.

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