shock

33 ENTRIES FOUND:

1shock

noun \ˈshäk\

Definition of SHOCK

:  a pile of sheaves of grain or stalks of Indian corn set up in a field with the butt ends down

Origin of SHOCK

Middle English; akin to Middle High German schoc heap
First Known Use: 14th century

Other Agriculture/Gardening Terms

fallow, graft, heirloom, loam, potash, soilage, swath, tilth, windfall

2shock

transitive verb

Definition of SHOCK

:  to collect into shocks

First Known Use of SHOCK

15th century

Other Agriculture/Gardening Terms

fallow, graft, heirloom, loam, potash, soilage, swath, tilth, windfall

3shock

noun, often attributive

Definition of SHOCK

1
:  the impact or encounter of individuals or groups in combat
2
a :  a violent shake or jar :  concussion
b :  an effect of such violence
3
a (1) :  a disturbance in the equilibrium or permanence of something (2) :  a sudden or violent mental or emotional disturbance
b :  something that causes such disturbance <the loss came as a shock>
c :  a state of being so disturbed <were in shock after they heard the news>
4
:  a state of profound depression of the vital processes associated with reduced blood volume and pressure and caused usually by severe especially crushing injuries, hemorrhage, or burns
5
:  sudden stimulation of the nerves and convulsive contraction of the muscles caused by the discharge of electricity through the animal body
6

Origin of SHOCK

Middle French choc, from choquer to strike against, from Old French choquier, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Middle Dutch schocken to jolt
First Known Use: 1565

4shock

verb

Definition of SHOCK

transitive verb
1
a :  to strike with surprise, terror, horror, or disgust
b :  to cause to undergo a physical or nervous shock
c :  to subject to the action of an electrical discharge
2
:  to drive by or as if by a shock
intransitive verb
1
:  to meet with a shock :  collide
2
:  to cause surprise or shock <an exhibit meant to shock>
shock·able \ˈshä-kə-bəl\ adjective

First Known Use of SHOCK

1656

5shock

adjective

—used to describe something that surprises and usually upsets people

Full Definition of SHOCK

:  bushy, shaggy

Origin of SHOCK

perhaps from 1shock
First Known Use: 1681

6shock

noun

Definition of SHOCK

:  a thick bushy mass (as of hair)

First Known Use of SHOCK

1819

shock

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

State in which the circulatory system fails to supply enough blood to peripheral tissues to meet basic requirements. Symptoms—weak, rapid pulse; low blood pressure; and cold, sweaty skin—are not all present in every case. Causes include low blood volume, caused by bleeding or fluid loss from burns or dehydration; inability of the heart to pump enough blood, due to heart attack, pulmonary embolism, or cardiac tamponade (compression of the heart by fluid in the membrane around it); and blood-vessel dilation as a result of septicemia, allergy (including anaphylaxis), or drugs. All result in reduced capillary blood flow; reflexes increase heart rate and constrict small blood vessels to protect the blood supply to essential organs. Without treatment of the underlying cause, these mechanisms fail; since the cause is not always clear, cases tend to require different and occasionally contradictory treatment (e.g., intravenous fluids can save the life of a patient with massive blood loss but can overload a weakened heart).

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