bear

50 ENTRIES FOUND:

1bear

noun, often attributive \ˈber\

: any one of a group of large and heavy animals that have thick hair and sharp claws and that can stand on two legs like a person

finance : a person who expects the price of stocks to go down and who sells them to avoid losing money

: something that is difficult to do or deal with

plural bears

Full Definition of BEAR

1
or plural bear :  any of a family (Ursidae of the order Carnivora) of large heavy mammals of America and Eurasia that have long shaggy hair, rudimentary tails, and plantigrade feet and feed largely on fruit, plant matter, and insects as well as on flesh
2
:  a surly, uncouth, burly, or shambling person <a tall, friendly bear of a man>
3
[probably from the proverb about selling the bearskin before catching the bear] :  one that sells securities or commodities in expectation of a price decline — compare bull
4
:  something difficult to do or deal with <the oven is a bear to clean>
bear·like \-ˌlīk\ adjective

Examples of BEAR

  1. a mother bear and her cubs
  2. The bears outnumbered the bulls on Wall Street today.
  3. Traffic in Knoxville, Tennessee, can be a bear anytime, but in late spring the slowdowns on Neyland Drive are often caused by Canada geese. —Joelle Anthony, Audubon, November-December 2004

Origin of BEAR

Middle English bere, from Old English bera; akin to Old English brūn brown — more at brown
First Known Use: before 12th century

Other Mammals Terms

dormouse, dugong, gibbon, grimalkin, sable, stoat, ungulate, vole

2bear

verb \ˈber\

: to accept or endure (something) ( US )

: to be worthy of (something) : to deserve or allow (something)

: to assume or accept (something, such as cost or responsibility)

bore \ˈbr\ borne also born \ˈbrn\ bear·ing

Full Definition of BEAR

transitive verb
1
a :  to move while holding up and supporting (something)
b :  to be equipped or furnished with (something)
c :  behave, conduct <bearing himself well>
d :  to have as a feature or characteristic <bears a likeness to her grandmother>
e :  to give as testimony <bear false witness>
f :  to have as an identification <bore the name of John>
g :  to hold in the mind or emotions <bear malice>
h :  disseminate
i :  lead, escort
j :  render, give
2
a :  to give birth to
b :  to produce as yield
c (1) :  to permit growth of
(2) :  contain <oil-bearing shale>
3
a :  to support the weight of :  sustain
b :  to accept or allow oneself to be subjected to especially without giving way <couldn't bear the pain> <I can't bear seeing you cry>
c :  to call for as suitable or essential <it bears watching>
d :  to hold above, on top, or aloft
e :  to admit of :  allow
f :  assume, accept
4
:  thrust, press
intransitive verb
1
:  to produce fruit :  yield
2
a :  to force one's way
b :  to extend in a direction indicated or implied
c :  to be situated :  lie
d :  to become directed
e :  to go or incline in an indicated direction
3
:  to support a weight or strain —often used with up
4
a :  to exert influence or force
b :  apply, pertain —often used with on or upon <facts bearing on the question>
bear a hand
:  to join in and help out
bear arms
1
:  to carry or possess arms
2
:  to serve as a soldier
bear fruit
:  to come to satisfying fruition, production, or development :  to produce a desired result or reward
bear in mind
:  to think of (something) especially as a warning :  remember
bear with
:  to be indulgent, patient, or forbearing with (someone)

Examples of BEAR

  1. a symphony that can bear comparison with Beethoven's best
  2. The company agreed to bear the costs.
  3. The criminals must bear full responsibility for the deaths of these innocent people.
  4. Who will bear the blame for this tragedy?
  5. A stone slab bearing 3,000-year-old writing previously unknown to scholars has been found in the Mexican state of Veracruz, and archaeologists say it is an example of the oldest script ever discovered in the Western Hemisphere. —John Noble Wilford,New York Times, 15 Sept. 2006

Origin of BEAR

Middle English beren to carry, bring forth, from Old English beran; akin to Old High German beran to carry, Latin ferre, Greek pherein
First Known Use: before 12th century

Related to BEAR

Synonyms
birth [chiefly dialect], deliver, drop, have, mother, produce, give birth to, live with, lump (it), stand for, tough (it) out
Antonyms
disavow, disclaim, disown, repudiate

Synonym Discussion of BEAR

bear, suffer, endure, abide, tolerate, stand mean to put up with something trying or painful. bear usually implies the power to sustain without flinching or breaking <forced to bear a tragic loss>. suffer often suggests acceptance or passivity rather than courage or patience in bearing <suffering many insults>. endure implies continuing firm or resolute through trials and difficulties <endured years of rejection>. abide suggests acceptance without resistance or protest <cannot abide their rudeness>. tolerate suggests overcoming or successfully controlling an impulse to resist, avoid, or resent something injurious or distasteful <refused to tolerate such treatment>. stand emphasizes even more strongly the ability to bear without discomposure or flinching <unable to stand teasing>.

Bear

geographical name \ˈber\

Definition of BEAR

river 350 miles (563 kilometers) N Utah, SW Wyoming, & SE Idaho flowing to Great Salt Lake

bear

transitive verb \ˈba(ə)r, ˈbe(ə)r\   (Medical Dictionary)
bore \ˈbō(ə)r, ˈb(ə)r\ borne \ˈbō(ə)rn, ˈb(ə)rn\ also born \ˈb(ə)rn\ bear·ing

Medical Definition of BEAR

: to give birth to

bear

noun    (Concise Encyclopedia)

Generally massive, short-legged mammals constituting the family Ursidae. Bears are the most recently evolved carnivore, found in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Closely related to the dog and the raccoon, most bears climb with ease and are strong swimmers. As a family, they are omnivores, but dietary preferences vary among species (the polar bear feeds mainly on seals, the spectacled bear on vegetation, etc.). Though they do not truly hibernate, bears often sleep fitfully through much of the winter. They live 15–30 years in the wild but much longer in captivity. They have been hunted as trophies, for hides, and for food. See also black bear; brown bear; sun bear.

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