workload

noun
work·​load | \ ˈwərk-ˌlōd How to pronounce workload (audio) \

Definition of workload

1 : the amount of work or of working time expected or assigned students with a heavy workload
2 : the amount of work performed or capable of being performed (as by a mechanical device) usually within a specific period

Examples of workload in a Sentence

Students complained about the heavy workload.
Recent Examples on the Web But as the number of Social Security beneficiaries grew, Social Security officials noted that this once-a-month payment schedule was putting a huge workload on their field offices and call centers at the beginning of each month. Tom Margenau, Dallas News, "The age-old rules: Facts about Social Security checks everyone should know," 25 Apr. 2021 Berry has a big workload ahead of him with Milic at the World U-18s. Dylan Bumbarger, oregonlive, "Seattle Thunderbirds at Portland Winterhawks: Preview, updates, chat, how to listen and watch," 24 Apr. 2021 The medical examiner’s office is responsible for investigating and certifying any death that is sudden, unexpected, violent or of public health interest, a workload that amounted to over 1,600 cases last year. Megan Cassidy, San Francisco Chronicle, "Meet San Francisco's next chief medical examiner," 15 Apr. 2021 The position entailed a pay cut and a bigger workload, but Huckaby accepted, partly out of personal loyalty to Miller. Phil Kloer, ajc, "Hank Huckaby, served in some of Georgia’s highest offices, dies at 79.," 15 Apr. 2021 The Lakers made a calculated risk in going younger this season partly because of health concerns and also because proportionally Schroder would be able to handle a bigger workload than Rondo did last season. Matt Eppers, USA TODAY, "NBA roundtable: Who deserves more attention as serious championship contenders?," 14 Apr. 2021 So much of the configuration state of a cloud workload ends up being manifested in configuration definition. John Grange, Forbes, "What’s The Future Of CSPM? It’s Brighter Than You Might Think," 9 Apr. 2021 However, citing an already-heavy workload, Weitzman withdrew from the case in June 1994, and was quickly replaced by lawyer Robert Shapiro. Daniel Kreps, Rolling Stone, "Howard Weitzman, Hollywood Lawyer Who Repped Michael Jackson Estate, Dead at 81," 8 Apr. 2021 Weitzman cited a heavy workload for leaving the case. Los Angeles Times, "Hollywood lawyer Howard Weitzman, attorney to Michael Jackson, Justin Bieber, dies," 8 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'workload.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of workload

1899, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for workload

Time Traveler

The first known use of workload was in 1899

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Statistics for workload

Last Updated

6 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Workload.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/workload. Accessed 11 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for workload

workload

noun

English Language Learners Definition of workload

: the amount of work that is expected to be done

More from Merriam-Webster on workload

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for workload

Britannica English: Translation of workload for Arabic Speakers

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