withhold

verb
with·​hold | \ with-ˈhōld How to pronounce withhold (audio) , wit͟h-\
withheld\ with-​ˈheld How to pronounce withheld (audio) , wit͟h-​ \; withholding

Definition of withhold

transitive verb

1 : to hold back from action : check
2 archaic : to keep in custody
3 : to refrain from granting, giving, or allowing withhold permission
4 : to deduct (withholding tax) from income

intransitive verb

: forbear, refrain withhold from commenting

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Other Words from withhold

withholder noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for withhold

Synonyms

decline, deny, disallow, disapprove, negative, nix, refuse, reject, reprobate

Antonyms

allow, concede, grant, let, OK (or okay), permit

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Choose the Right Synonym for withhold

keep, retain, detain, withhold, reserve mean to hold in one's possession or under one's control. keep may suggest a holding securely in one's possession, custody, or control. keep this while I'm gone retain implies continued keeping, especially against threatened seizure or forced loss. managed to retain their dignity even in poverty detain suggests a delay in letting go. detained them for questioning withhold implies restraint in letting go or a refusal to let go. withheld information from the authorities reserve suggests a keeping in store for future use. reserve some of your energy for the last mile

Examples of withhold in a Sentence

She was accused of withholding evidence. She has $20 withheld from her paycheck every week.

Recent Examples on the Web

An independent legal review commissioned by the company’s board found there was no basis for withholding the payment,... Nick Kostov, WSJ, "WPP Will Pay Martin Sorrell More Than $2 Million in Shares as Part of Long-Term Bonus," 14 Mar. 2019 Outrage and subsequent action is reserved for certain communities, and withheld from others. Gianluca Russo, Teen Vogue, "Dolce & Gabbana's 'Chinese Chopsticks' Ad Isn't the Only Reason We Should Stop Supporting Them," 21 Nov. 2018 The first significant benefit for individuals came in February 2018, when the IRS released new paycheck-withholding tables. Richard Rubin, WSJ, "WSJ Tax Guide 2019: The Political Implications of the Tax Overhaul," 15 Feb. 2019 That is because the IRS changed the default rules for calculating how much is withheld from paychecks for taxes. Richard Rubin, WSJ, "Expecting a Big Tax Refund? Don’t Be So Sure," 27 Jan. 2019 But both agree that this crucial detail was intentionally withheld from her. Anna North, Vox, "The disturbing story behind the rape scene in Bernardo Bertolucci’s Last Tango in Paris, explained," 26 Nov. 2018 Elder said the names of the three dead were being withheld until relatives could be notified. Fox News, "3 people killed, 24 injured after multi-vehicle crash involving tour bus in New Mexico," 2 Oct. 2018 The inmate, who’s name was withheld pending family notifications, was found distressed and unresponsive about 10 p.m., San Diego County sheriff’s homicide Lt. Alex Riggins, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Inmate death at Vista jail under investigation," 11 July 2018 The department notes the family of the child has asked that his name be withheld for now. CBS News, "Newborn baby killed, dozens injured when tornado strikes North Dakota city," 11 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'withhold.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of withhold

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for withhold

Middle English, from with from + holden to hold — more at with

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Statistics for withhold

Last Updated

22 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for withhold

The first known use of withhold was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for withhold

withhold

verb

Financial Definition of withhold

What It Is

Withholding refers to withholding tax, which is an amount that employers withhold from an employee's paycheck and remit to local and federal taxing authorities on behalf of the employee.

How It Works

For example, let's say John Doe's salary is $24,000 a year. Though he makes $2,000 a month, he only brings home $1,800 because his employer takes $200 out of his paycheck and remits it to the state and the federal government on his behalf. The payments go toward John Doe's federal income tax, state income tax, unemployment, and Medicare liabilities.

The amount of withholding is influenced by what John Doe puts on his IRS Form W-4 ("Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate"), which he provides to the employer and on which he indicates how many dependents he has and his marital status, among other things. A copy goes directly to the IRS. Generally, the more allowances the employee claims on a Form W-4, the lower the withholding tax.

Withholding tax applies to income earned through wages, pensions, bonuses, commissions, and gambling winnings. Dividends and capital gains, for example, are not subject to withholding tax. Self-employed people generally don't pay withholding taxes; they typically make quarterly estimated payments instead.

Why It Matters

Withholding tax prevents people from being blindsided by huge tax bills on April 15. By having their employers remit a little out of each paycheck, federal and local governments also ensure steady cash flow throughout the year and reduce the risk that taxpayers will be unable to pay their taxes. A person's tax liability may still be more or less than what he or she pays in withholding taxes in a year. In those cases, the taxpayer may have to pay more money on April 15 or may receive a tax refund. It is important to note that accuracy in payroll is crucial; any mistakes in remitting withholding tax are generally the taxpayer's problem even if they are the employer's fault.

Source: Investing Answers

withhold

verb

English Language Learners Definition of withhold

: to hold (something) back
: to refuse to provide (something)
US : to take out (an amount of money for taxes) from someone's income

withhold

verb
with·​hold | \ with-ˈhōld How to pronounce withhold (audio) , wit͟h-\
withheld\ -​ˈheld \; withholding

Kids Definition of withhold

: to refuse to give, grant, or allow The teacher withheld permission.

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More from Merriam-Webster on withhold

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with withhold

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for withhold

Spanish Central: Translation of withhold

Nglish: Translation of withhold for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of withhold for Arabic Speakers

Comments on withhold

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