winch

noun
\ ˈwinch \

Definition of winch 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : any of various machines or instruments for hauling or pulling especially : a powerful machine with one or more drums on which to coil a rope, cable, or chain for hauling or hoisting : windlass

2 : a crank with a handle for giving motion to a machine (such as a grindstone)

winch

verb
winched; winching; winches

Definition of winch (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to hoist or haul with or as if with a winch

Illustration of winch

Illustration of winch

Noun

winch 1

In the meaning defined above

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Other words from winch

Verb

wincher noun

Examples of winch in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

To pull another vehicle with a winch, put your vehicle in neutral and stand on the brakes. Wes Siler, Outside Online, "The Gear You Need to Get Your Truck Unstuck," 19 June 2018 Using wire cutters, hooks, and winches, the demonstrators tried to pull down the barriers that Israeli forces have relied upon to hold back the protesters. Iyad Abuheweila, BostonGlobe.com, "3 killed as Gaza protesters again charge fence," 27 Apr. 2018 The most common piece of gear on a seine vessel is also one of the deadliest – the rotating capstan winch used for winding ropes. Laine Welch, Anchorage Daily News, "Why aren’t more fishermen using this life-saving device?," 25 Feb. 2018 Witnesses at the Gunfighter Skies Air & Space Celebration had said Buchanan appeared to have lost control of his glider at 1:38 p.m. after the plane clipped the cable, which was attached to a winch trailer pulled by the truck. John Sowell, idahostatesman, "Comedy routine that went awry led to pilot's death at Mountain Home airshow, report says," 26 June 2018 The winch operator let out the cable and maintained tension as the glider climbed to about 1,500 feet. John Sowell, idahostatesman, "Comedy routine that went awry led to pilot's death at Mountain Home airshow, report says," 26 June 2018 As the terrain was inaccessible by foot, rescuers used a 60-foot winch to pull her out of the ravine. Jessie Yeung, CNN, "Missing Korean hiker survives six days at bottom of Australian ravine," 8 June 2018 In the water, the data center is partially submerged and held in place with 10 winches and cranes. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "Microsoft's New Data Center Sits at the Bottom of the Sea," 7 June 2018 Delray Beach firefighters had to use a winch to pull the vehicles apart to get to the minivan, but the Raschiotto siblings and her children were already dead, Delray Beach police spokeswoman Dani Moschella said at the time. Linda Trischitta, Sun-Sentinel.com, "Fatal Delray Beach crash led to 'loss of his entire family at the same exact moment'," 8 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

With one of those, if a component fails while winching, the line will simply fall to the ground without killing you. Wes Siler, Outside Online, "The Gear You Need to Get Your Truck Unstuck," 19 June 2018 The Scots saw the gigantic beams and basket winched into place. William Gurstelle, Popular Mechanics, "The Legend of Ludgar the War Wolf, King of the Trebuchets," 1 May 2017 Many of Lewis' rescues involve winching victims back out of the vertical pits that distinguish Southeastern caves. Bo Emerson, ajc, "Cave rescuers in Southeast watch their Thai colleagues with admiration," 10 July 2018 The 25-year-old was winched from the forest by a rescue helicopter which took her to the town of Tully where she was assessed at a hospital. Fox News, "Korean woman survives 6 nights lost in Australian wilderness," 7 June 2018 The movers deposited him in the pool and winched open a gate at the far end. Andy Newman, New York Times, "How Do You Move a Shark? Very Carefully," 16 May 2018 On shore, winches like the ones that raise and lower the sails can also generate electricity to charge cellphones. Jimmy Golen, The Christian Science Monitor, "Global sailing race spotlights plastic pollution in oceans," 18 May 2018 On shore, winches like the ones that raise and lower the sails can also generate electricity to charge cellphones. Washington Post, "Round-the-world sailing race works to protect its racetrack," 18 May 2018 Marshalls can be seen running to his side before the Mitsubishi is winched onto a recovery truck and taken away. Fox News, "Racing driver survives dramatic 100 mph rollover wreck," 11 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'winch.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of winch

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1529, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for winch

Noun

Middle English winche roller, reel, from Old English wince; akin to Old English wincian to wink

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Statistics for winch

Last Updated

14 Aug 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for winch

The first known use of winch was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for winch

winch

noun

English Language Learners Definition of winch

: a machine that has a rope or chain and that is used for pulling or lifting heavy things

winch

noun
\ ˈwinch \

Kids Definition of winch

: a machine that has a roller on which rope is wound for pulling or lifting

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More from Merriam-Webster on winch

See words that rhyme with winch

Spanish Central: Translation of winch

Nglish: Translation of winch for Spanish Speakers

Comments on winch

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