willow

noun
wil·low | \ˈwi-(ˌ)lō \

Definition of willow 

1 : any of a genus (Salix of the family Salicaceae, the willow family) of trees and shrubs bearing catkins of apetalous flowers and including forms of value for wood, osiers, or tanbark and a few ornamentals

2 : an object made of willow wood especially : a cricket bat

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Other Words from willow

willowlike \ˈwi-lō-ˌlīk \ adjective

Examples of willow in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

The mother trees are somewhere else, and the seeds have been brought in by birds (mulberries, hackberries) or the wind (cottonwoods, willows and box elders). Neil Sperry, star-telegram, "Volunteering is great but 'volunteer' plants are a whole different story," 1 June 2018 On the five hundred acres of the Storm King Art Center, in Cornwall, New York, the sight of weeping willows or maples is no surprise—but a tropical-palm grove? The New Yorker, "Outdoor Artworks Tackle Environmental Issues, at Storm King," 22 June 2018 Basically, willows can be found wherever freshwater is abundant. Dave Taft, New York Times, "Spring Arrives on Kitten’s Paws," 4 Apr. 2018 Moose, for example, can strip willows for two hours then lie down for a few hours, repeating that cycle all day and all night. Ned Rozell, Anchorage Daily News, "During long summer days in Alaska, Boreal owls perform by daylight," 30 June 2018 There is a slight bend here, as the river moves around a willow. Heather Radke, Longreads, "A Beginner’s Guide to Fly Fishing With Your Father," 16 June 2018 Our possible species include the willow, alder, Acadian, least and yellow-bellied flycatchers. Taylor Piephoff, charlotteobserver, "Willow flycatchers are maddingly difficult to identify in the field," 13 June 2018 Five types that come up commonly in the beds at our house are cottonwoods, willows, hackberries, mulberries and box elders. Neil Sperry, star-telegram, "Volunteering is great but 'volunteer' plants are a whole different story," 1 June 2018 Unfortunately the trees, especially willows, are so prone to their invasion that there is no good preventive or cure. Neil Sperry, San Antonio Express-News, "HG Sperry 0519," 18 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'willow.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of willow

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for willow

Middle English wilghe, wilowe, from Old English welig; akin to Middle High German wilge willow

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Statistics for willow

Last Updated

8 Sep 2018

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Time Traveler for willow

The first known use of willow was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for willow

willow

noun

English Language Learners Definition of willow

: a tree that has long, narrow leaves and strong, thin branches that are used to make baskets

willow

noun
wil·low | \ˈwi-lō \

Kids Definition of willow

: a tree or bush with narrow leaves, catkins for flowers, and tough flexible stems sometimes used in making baskets

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