wield

verb

wielded; wielding; wields

transitive verb

1
chiefly dialectal : to deal successfully with : manage
2
: to handle (something, such as a tool) especially effectively
wield a broom
3
a
: to exert one's authority by means of
wield influence
b
: to have at one's command or disposal
did not wield appropriate credentialsG. W. Bonham
wielder noun

Examples of wield in a Sentence

The man was wielding a gun. Can he wield a hammer? He wields a great deal of influence over his students.
Recent Examples on the Web Orlando wielded power over the board as its president for three decades, while John Spahi served on the board for roughly 18 years. James Queally, Los Angeles Times, 11 Apr. 2024 Trump has also posted a photo of himself wielding a bat at Bragg's head, among other attacks on the district attorney. Aysha Bagchi, USA TODAY, 11 Apr. 2024 But in the first trailer, there's no sign of either the sledgehammer or baseball bat that Harley Quinn has prominently wielded in comics, cartoons, and live-action movies ever since. EW.com, 10 Apr. 2024 To improve their fortunes, the team recruits several talented female ringers, including Kate (model/actress Kate Upton), who wields a mean bat. Frank Scheck, The Hollywood Reporter, 9 Apr. 2024 Since hip-hop’s founding 50 years ago, artists have wielded those sentiments to illustrate their realities. Jason Parham, WIRED, 9 Apr. 2024 Nguyen, who is an executive producer, and the creative team hope the series will force viewers to center the Vietnamese perspective of the conflict while rethinking fundamental American myths, including about how the country still wields its geopolitical power in a fractured world today. Andrew R. Chow, TIME, 9 Apr. 2024 High profile campaigns also wield a relative amount of power for addressing disinformation like this. Meg Little Reilly, Forbes, 29 Mar. 2024 Given that the West seems to be stagnating in terms of innovation, and is no longer wielding technological prowess over the rest of the world, what might be his view of Western recovery be? Tracey Follows, Forbes, 29 Mar. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'wield.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Middle English welden to control, from Old English wieldan; akin to Old High German waltan to rule, Latin valēre to be strong, be worth

First Known Use

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of wield was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near wield

Cite this Entry

“Wield.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wield. Accessed 15 Apr. 2024.

Kids Definition

wield

verb
1
: to put (as a tool) to good use
wield a broom
2
: to use one's authority by means of
wield influence
wielder noun

More from Merriam-Webster on wield

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