whiz

1 of 3

verb

variants or whizz
whizzed; whizzing

intransitive verb

1
: to hum, whir, or hiss like a speeding object (such as an arrow or ball) passing through air
2
: to fly or move swiftly especially with a whiz
cars whizzing by

transitive verb

: to cause to whiz
especially : to rotate very rapidly

whiz

2 of 3

noun (1)

variants or whizz
plural whizzes
1
: a hissing, buzzing, or whirring sound
2
: a movement or passage of something accompanied by a whizzing sound
3
sometimes vulgar : an act of urinating
used especially in the phrase take a whiz

whiz

3 of 3

noun (2)

plural whizzes
: wizard sense 2
a math whiz

Examples of whiz in a Sentence

Verb The ball whizzed through the air. Cars whizzed by on the highway. He whizzed past us on skates. She whizzed through the exam.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Yet upon stepping into the lobby, tucked away in a small piazza past the whizzing motorcycles of the Via del Corso, the feel is decidedly more contemporary. Liam Hess, Vogue, 28 Nov. 2023 After sunscreen, lip balm, and face mist, McRae prepares to whiz right through the next phase of her beauty routine. Jenny Berg, Vogue, 3 Jan. 2024 Train travel is a distinct way to see the world as you’re lulled into relaxation by the calming chug of the engine and lovely landscapes whizzing by. Tracy Scott Forson, Smithsonian Magazine, 5 Jan. 2024 Bullets whizzed overhead as people ducked for cover, witnesses said. Simone Weichselbaum, NBC News, 5 Dec. 2023 And when you’re done whizzing down the slopes, come meet me at the hut for a nice après-ski toast! Bianca Kratky, Travel + Leisure, 19 Nov. 2023 Lick? Not permitting a dog to stop and sniff on a walk means important and interesting smells are whizzing past a dog as they are pulled along on the leash. Emilie Le Beau Lucchesi, Discover Magazine, 11 Dec. 2023 His long motorcade whizzed down Beijing’s boulevards as traffic was held back at busy intersections. Laurel Rosenhall, Los Angeles Times, 2 Nov. 2023 Next Saturday, Formula 1 racing will return to Sin City after a 40-year hiatus with the inaugural Las Vegas Grand Prix, with drivers whizzing past the city’s most iconic landmarks along the 3.8-mile street circuit. Danielle Chemtob, Forbes, 13 Nov. 2023
Noun
But, last month, John Burn-Murdoch, a data whiz at the Financial Times, pointed out that Britain, France, and Germany also experienced big jumps in consumer prices, and yet their consumers haven’t been as gloomy as Americans have been. John Cassidy, The New Yorker, 22 Jan. 2024 Apple’s decision to hire this technical whiz — a Stanford engineering Ph.D. named Marcelo Lamego — is seen as the spark that sent Masimo’s lawyers after Apple. Mark Gurman, Fortune, 27 Dec. 2023 For her debut album, the techno whiz turns into a dance-pop singer-songwriter, delivering downy reveries that float on as her mind drifts back to California, old friends, and ice baths in Oslo. Pitchfork, 12 Dec. 2023 Damon stars as Will Hunting, a math whiz who was recently paroled from jail and works as a janitor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jacqueline Weiss, Peoplemag, 5 Dec. 2023 Stanford economist and flexible work whiz Nick Bloom predicts the rate of people working from home will remain just under one-third until 2026. Paige McGlauflin, Fortune, 1 Dec. 2023 Ease of layout: While some professionals will create photo books with these online services, the average person using them is unlikely to be a Photoshop or InDesign whiz. Valerie Walsh, wsj.com, 1 Nov. 2023 Their relationship in real life does feel very sister-y. Awkwafina really is a whiz. Seija Rankin, The Hollywood Reporter, 26 Oct. 2023 For the friend that’s a whiz in the kitchen, snag a KitchenAid Artisan Series Stand Mixer for $80 off, or really treat someone to a coffee shop-grade Breville Espresso Maker that’s $300 off right now. Dorian Smith-Garcia, Parents, 10 Oct. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'whiz.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

imitative

Noun (2)

probably by shortening & alteration

First Known Use

Verb

1582, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun (1)

1620, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

1914, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of whiz was in 1582

Dictionary Entries Near whiz

Cite this Entry

“Whiz.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/whiz. Accessed 20 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

whiz

1 of 3 verb
variants or whizz
ˈhwiz How to pronounce whiz (audio)
ˈwiz
whizzed; whizzing
1
: to hum, buzz, or hiss like a speeding object (as an arrow or ball) passing through air
2
: to fly, pass, or move swiftly with a buzzing sound
cars whizzing by
whizzer noun

whiz

2 of 3 noun
variants or whizz
plural whizzes
: a humming, buzzing, or hissing sound

whiz

3 of 3 noun
plural whizzes
: wizard sense 2
a math whiz
Etymology

Verb

probably coined in imitation of the sound of a speeding object going by

Noun

probably a shortened and altered form of wizard

More from Merriam-Webster on whiz

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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