vet

noun
\ ˈvet How to pronounce vet (audio) \

Definition of vet

 (Entry 1 of 3)

vet

adjective or noun

Definition of vet (Entry 2 of 3)

vet

verb
vetted; vetting

Definition of vet (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

1a : to evaluate for possible approval or acceptance vet the candidates for a position
b : to subject to usually expert appraisal or correction vet a manuscript
2a : to provide veterinary care for (an animal) or medical care for (a person)
b : to subject (a person or animal) to a physical examination or checkup

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Other Words from vet

Verb

vetter noun

A Brief History of the Verb Vet

Verb

When we vet a statement for accuracy or vet a candidate for a position, what are we doing, literally? Does the verb have something to do with veteran "a person with long experience," perhaps indicating that the thing or person vetted is proved to be tried and true?

Interestingly, the word is not related to veteran at all, but rather to veterinarian "an animal doctor." That noun was shortened to vet by the mid-19th century and, within decades, gave rise to a verb vet meaning "to subject (an animal) to medical examination." The verb was soon applied to human beings as well, broadening in sense to "to perform a medical checkup on." By the early 20th century, this word took on the figurative meaning that is now most familiar: "to subject a person or thing to scrutiny; to examine for flaws."

Examples of vet in a Sentence

Noun I have to take my dog to the vet. Verb They vetted her thoroughly before offering her the job. The book was vetted by several different editors. He's already vetted the plan, so we can start right away.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The vet said Dolly had significant damage to her trachea, consistent with strangulation. Evan Casey, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "A Brookfield woman will spend time in jail after she dragged a dog so badly that it died of its injuries," 29 Mar. 2021 For meeting the vet, veterinary practices have seen a significant increase in pets brought in from March to early July 2020, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association. Garfield Hylton, orlandosentinel.com, "National Puppy Day takes special meaning for dogs adopted during the pandemic," 23 Mar. 2021 The vet told investigators that the dogs did not appear to be involved in dogfighting, Wilkins said. Carly Ryan, CNN, "10 dogs found dead in trash bags in a North Carolina ditch," 23 Mar. 2021 Naylor wasted no time driving the animal to the local vet for a course of antibiotics, returning him to his burrow later that evening. Heather Richardson, Travel + Leisure, "How Two Safari Destinations Are Helping the World Better Understand Pangolins," 22 Mar. 2021 Roberto Cruz, the Army vet wounded by sniper fire, knows the importance of getting treatment. NBC news, "For veterans with PTSD, pandemic ‘feels a lot like wartime’," 6 Mar. 2021 He was constantly getting beat to the punch, thanks to the timing of the vet. J.l. Kirven, Detroit Free Press, "Flint native Anthony Dirrell draws with underdog Kyrone Davis: 'Thought I won'," 28 Feb. 2021 Finally, the vet was able to remove the shoe, which appeared to be intact, according to photos taken in the surgery room. Caitlin O'kane, CBS News, "Vets surgically remove shoe from stomach of 341-pound crocodile," 22 Feb. 2021 Four more appointments, confirmed, with minutes to spare for the vet. Zach Helfand, The New Yorker, "A Fairy Godmother to the Vaccine Have-Nots," 22 Feb. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb New pets caused a bump in the pet care industry, notes the American Pet Products Association, and spending on pet food, live animals, supplies, treats and vet care bumped up to $99 billion in 2020, up from $90.5 billion in 2018. Lorraine Allen, Good Housekeeping, "Here's How Real Families Who Adopted Pandemic Pets Are Handling Things Months Later," 22 Mar. 2021 Perhaps the most obvious first step is to simply find and vet sponsors more quickly. Felipe De La Hoz, The New Republic, "The Infernal Challenge of Ending “Kids In Cages”," 15 Mar. 2021 The House voted 227 to 203 to approve the expansion of background checks, and 219 to 210 to give federal law enforcement more time to vet gun buyers. New York Times, "House Passes Gun Control Bills to Strengthen Background Checks," 11 Mar. 2021 The information comes from VaccineFinder, operated by Boston Children’s Hospital, but Apple will also vet submissions from other providers for possible inclusion in its database. Joanna Stern, WSJ, "Booking a Covid-19 Vaccine? More Tools and Tips, Plus Help From Apple, Facebook and Google," 18 Mar. 2021 China's political congress approved on Thursday a draft decision to change Hong Kong's electoral system, further reducing democratic representation in the city's institutions and introducing a mechanism to vet politicians' loyalty to Beijing. NBC News, "Hong Kong: G7 expresses 'grave concerns' over electoral changes," 13 Mar. 2021 Our Lab pros work to vet and approve items for the Green Good Housekeeping Seal, granted only to products that meet strict performance and sustainability criteria. Emma Seymour, Good Housekeeping, "What Is Greenwashing?," 9 Mar. 2021 Skillshare doesn’t vet the instructors, but does enforce course guidelines. Dave Johnson, Forbes, "The 9 Best Platforms For Premium And Free Online Courses, Plus One Invaluable Learning App," 3 Mar. 2021 The vote was 219-210 to pass a second one giving federal law enforcement more time to vet gun purchasers. Catie Edmondson, BostonGlobe.com, "House passes bills to expand and strengthen gun background checks," 11 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'vet.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of vet

Noun

1848, in the meaning defined above

Adjective or noun

1848, in the meaning defined above

Verb

1875, in the meaning defined at sense 2a

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Statistics for vet

Last Updated

4 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Vet.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vet. Accessed 11 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for vet

vet

verb

English Language Learners Definition of vet

: to investigate (someone) thoroughly to see if they should be approved or accepted for a job
: to check (something) carefully to make sure it is acceptable

vet

noun
\ ˈvet How to pronounce vet (audio) \

Kids Definition of vet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

vet

noun

Kids Definition of vet (Entry 2 of 2)

vet

noun
\ ˈvet How to pronounce vet (audio) \

Medical Definition of vet

 (Entry 1 of 2)

vetted; vetting

Medical Definition of vet (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to provide veterinary care for (an animal) or medical care for (a person)
2 : to subject (a person or animal) to a physical examination or checkup

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More from Merriam-Webster on vet

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for vet

Nglish: Translation of vet for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of vet for Arabic Speakers

Comments on vet

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