vacuole

noun

vac·​u·​ole ˈva-kyə-ˌwōl How to pronounce vacuole (audio)
1
: a small cavity or space in the tissues of an organism containing air or fluid
2
: a cavity or vesicle in the cytoplasm of a cell usually containing fluid see cell illustration
vacuolar adjective

Examples of vacuole in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Increasing the acidity inside the vacuole may decrease it outside the vacuole, causing enzymes there to work faster and wear out sooner, which may also help explain the higher death rate among these altered cells. Byelizabeth Pennisi, science.org, 18 Apr. 2023 Burnetti hoped the rhodopsin would find its way into the yeast’s vacuole, an enzyme-laden sac that degrades unneeded proteins. Byelizabeth Pennisi, science.org, 18 Apr. 2023 The green enclosure is a vacuole. Discover Magazine, 29 June 2010 The plant then converts the CO2 to a chemical called malate and tucks it away for the night in a cellular closet called a vacuole. Kurt Kleiner, Smithsonian Magazine, 18 Nov. 2022 This vacuole pushes the cell’s essential proteins, sugars and metabolites against its membrane, facilitating easier diffusion. Sumeet Kulkarni, Los Angeles Times, 23 June 2022 Depending on the density of the flock and speed of the predator, the starlings’ reactions can take many escape patterns, including flying outward to create a vacuole—an empty space. Lauryn Hill, Wired, 5 Feb. 2021 The central empty spaces are vacuoles, which get larger and larger as injured cells approach death. Sharon Begley, STAT, 3 May 2018 Unlike Thioploca and a related genus called Beggiatoa, it was not contained in a containment sac called a vacuole. Scientific American Blog Network, 21 Apr. 2017

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'vacuole.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

borrowed from French, probably borrowed from New Latin vacuolum "little vacuum," from Medieval Latin vacuum vacuum entry 1 + Latin -olum, variant of -ulum -ule with stems ending in a vowel

First Known Use

1853, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of vacuole was in 1853

Dictionary Entries Near vacuole

Cite this Entry

“Vacuole.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vacuole. Accessed 16 Jul. 2024.

Kids Definition

vacuole

noun
vac·​u·​ole ˈvak-yə-ˌwōl How to pronounce vacuole (audio)
: a cavity in bodily tissues or in the cytoplasm of a cell that is usually filled with fluid
vacuolar adjective

Medical Definition

vacuole

noun
vac·​u·​ole ˈvak-yə-ˌwōl How to pronounce vacuole (audio)
1
: a small cavity or space in the tissues of an organism containing air or fluid
2
: a cavity or vesicle in the cytoplasm of a cell containing fluid

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