truce

noun
\ ˈtrüs How to pronounce truce (audio) \

Definition of truce

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a suspension of fighting especially of considerable duration by agreement of opposing forces : armistice, cease-fire
2 : a respite especially from a disagreeable or painful state or action

truce

verb
truced; trucing

Definition of truce (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to make a truce

transitive verb

: to end with a truce

Synonyms for truce

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of truce in a Sentence

Noun There's been an uneasy truce between her and her parents for the past several months. both sides agreed to a 24-hour truce beginning at midnight on Christmas Eve
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun After more than seven years of civil war, there’s now a truce, but infrastructure like water tanks, roads and bridges are significantly damaged, and famine is spreading. Chloe Sorvino, Forbes, 7 June 2022 President Joe Biden welcomed the truce renewal and stressed that ending the war in Yemen has been a priority of his administration. Noha Elhennawy, ajc, 2 June 2022 After a messy incident at a state dinner, the Alex and Henry decide to call a truce — one that leads to a high-stakes and heady romantic entanglement. Matt Donnelly, Variety, 1 June 2022 But their long truce came to a shattering end last week, when a state court imposed a significant revision on New York’s congressional map. New York Times, 30 May 2022 For now, the truce between the FCC and telecom companies, on one side, and the FAA and aviation companies, on the other, is holding. Peter Elkind, ProPublica, 26 May 2022 Post-Reformation Europe had forced Catholicism and Protestantism into an uncertain truce, with Enlightenment ideas of tolerance banishing spiritual beliefs to the private sphere while public life focussed on politics. Casey Cep, The New Yorker, 6 Dec. 2021 His appeals for an Orthodox Easter truce in Ukraine went unheeded. Nicole Winfield, ajc, 4 May 2022 His appeal for a four-day truce during the Orthodox Holy Week was rejected by Moscow, which characterized it as a ruse to allow Ukraine’s military to rest and regroup. WSJ, 25 Apr. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'truce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of truce

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for truce

Noun

Middle English trewes, plural of trewe agreement, from Old English trēow fidelity; akin to Old English trēowe faithful — more at true entry 1

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Time Traveler for truce

Time Traveler

The first known use of truce was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near truce

Trubetzkoyan

truce

truceless

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Statistics for truce

Last Updated

20 Jun 2022

Cite this Entry

“Truce.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/truce. Accessed 27 Jun. 2022.

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More Definitions for truce

truce

noun
\ ˈtrüs How to pronounce truce (audio) \

Kids Definition of truce

: an agreement between enemies or opponents to stop fighting for a certain period of time

More from Merriam-Webster on truce

Nglish: Translation of truce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of truce for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about truce

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