treatise

noun
trea·​tise | \ ˈtrē-təs also -təz How to pronounce treatise (audio) \

Definition of treatise

1 : a systematic exposition or argument in writing including a methodical discussion of the facts and principles involved and conclusions reached a treatise on higher education
2 obsolete : account, tale

Examples of treatise in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web But for all of their entanglements with myriad histories and mythologies, Winker’s works are — at their essence — treatises on democracy and understanding. Danielle Avram, Dallas News, "A creation myth on canvas: Paul Winker’s paintings mix the divine and the minimal," 21 Jan. 2020 Warren, who was an important witness to the dramatic events in the dome on Ether Day, also published the first American treatise about mummies and mummification. Washington Post, "Knock yourself out in the Ether Dome," 9 Oct. 2019 Its title alluded to the loss of twittering birds from natural habitats because of indiscriminate pesticide use, and the treatise spawned the modern conservation movement. Jim Daley, Scientific American, "Silent Skies: Billions of North American Birds Have Vanished," 19 Sep. 2019 Many scholars have refuted the theory, both through scientific and genetic studies, as well as scriptural studies of the earliest treatise of mankind, the Rig Veda, that was composed during this period. Vikram Sampath, Quartz India, "The father of Hindutva believed Aryans migrated to India," 20 Aug. 2019 The book became a New Age treatise on mindfulness and positivity. Scottie Andrew, CNN, "Baba Ram Dass, psychedelic pioneer and New Age guru, is dead at 88," 23 Dec. 2019 The newspaper also cited a treatise on jury selection written in the 1960s and credited to a Dallas County assistant district attorney. Washington Post, "Diversity of jury seen as key factor in officer’s conviction," 4 Oct. 2019 Underneath the hood of the muscle car madness is a surprisingly radical treatise on the corporate exploitation of human labor. Tribune News Service, cleveland, "‘Ford v Ferrari’ takes muscle car madness on a thrill ride (review)," 13 Nov. 2019 From his treatise on education, Rousseau writes: The indifference of children towards meat is one proof that the taste for meat is unnatural; their preference is for vegetable foods, such as milk, pastry, fruit, etc. Alison Fishburn, Longreads, "Eating What Feels Right: On Going Vegetarian," 23 Oct. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'treatise.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of treatise

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for treatise

Middle English tretis, from Anglo-French tretiz, alteration of tretez, traitet, from Medieval Latin tractatus, from Latin tractare to treat, handle

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Time Traveler for treatise

Time Traveler

The first known use of treatise was in the 14th century

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Statistics for treatise

Last Updated

3 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Treatise.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/treatise. Accessed 27 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for treatise

treatise

noun
How to pronounce treatise (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of treatise

: a book, article, etc., that discusses a subject carefully and thoroughly

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