transience

noun
tran·​sience | \ ˈtran(t)-sh(ē-)ən(t)s How to pronounce transience (audio) ; ˈtran-zē-ən(t)s, ˈtran(t)-sē-; ˈtran-zhən(t)s, -jən(t)s\

Definition of transience

: the quality or state of being transient

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Examples of transience in a Sentence

wary of the transience of popular enthusiasms, the writers of the U.S. Constitution made changing the document a long and difficult process

Recent Examples on the Web

Inside, the place was quiet, cute, the walls entirely white, with a whiff of transience. John Gastaldo, National Geographic, "Navigating the booming cost of urban life," 12 June 2019 That transience means the virus can miss its opportunity to be part of the diverging host species. Quanta Magazine, "Viruses Would Rather Jump to New Hosts Than Evolve With Them," 13 Sep. 2017 Deserts are empty but also kind of intense; empty stadiums signify the melancholy transience of greatness. Sasha Chapin, New York Times, "Letter of Recommendation: Airport Layovers," 29 May 2018 Awareness of transience colors many of the late-life love stories that Ms. Gubar cites—including her own. Heller Mcalpin, WSJ, "‘Late-Life Love’ Review: The Glow at Sunset," 22 Nov. 2018 Namely, the creative director was inspired by wabi-sabi—a Japanese aesthetic centered on the acceptance of transience and imperfection. Lauren Alexis Fisher, Harper's BAZAAR, "Valentino Made It Rain Rose Petals At Its Pre-Fall 2019 Show in Tokyo," 27 Nov. 2018 Becoming comfortable with transience and the fact that everything ends is very important. latimes.com, "Refugees, optimism and literary roots: Viet Thanh Nguyen and Mohsin Hamid in conversation," 25 May 2018 Their transience inspires Makoto Igari to document hanabi every summer, when explosions light up the night skies across Japan. Laura Mallonee, WIRED, "'Fire Flowers' Dazzle in Gorgeous Photos of Japanese Fireworks," 4 July 2018 Nicholas Hoel is the heir to a family art project—several generations committed to photographing, once a month, the growth of a chestnut tree—that has instilled in him an awed appreciation of human transience. Nathaniel Rich, The Atlantic, "The Novel That Asks, ‘What Went Wrong With Mankind?’," 11 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'transience.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of transience

1745, in the meaning defined above

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Statistics for transience

Last Updated

24 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for transience

The first known use of transience was in 1745

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More from Merriam-Webster on transience

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for transience

Nglish: Translation of transience for Spanish Speakers

Comments on transience

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