tracheostomy

noun
tra·​che·​os·​to·​my | \ ˌtrā-kē-ˈä-stə-mē How to pronounce tracheostomy (audio) \
plural tracheostomies

Definition of tracheostomy

: the surgical formation of an opening into the trachea through the neck especially to allow the passage of air

Examples of tracheostomy in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Deprived of oxygen, Tuparan suffered severe brain damage, underwent a tracheostomy and intubation and was put on a ventilator. Kim Christensen, Los Angeles Times, "Dying Californians suffer harm and neglect from an industry meant to comfort them," 9 Dec. 2020 The strangest part was having the tracheostomy tube in his throat. Maggie Menderski, courier-journal.com, "Inches from death, La Grange man spends 95 days in the hospital battling COVID-19," 24 Nov. 2020 In addition, Brown underwent a tracheostomy, a medical procedure that creates an opening in the neck to place a tube into a person’s windpipe, allowing air to enter the lungs, the newspaper reported. orlandosentinel.com, "Florida couple weds in parking lot after weeks in hospital with COVID," 6 Nov. 2020 Surgeons performed a tracheostomy, where a breathing tube attached to a ventilator was inserted through a hole in her neck. Stephanie Innes, The Arizona Republic, "'Against all odds': Tempe mom, 31, spent more than 4 months hospitalized for COVID-19," 3 Nov. 2020 For those that do, at around the three-week point, the protocol is to perform a tracheostomy. Zach Helfand, The New Yorker, "The Complicated Ethics of Keeping a COVID-19 Patient Breathing," 22 Aug. 2020 Under normal conditions, a tracheostomy is a straightforward and uncontroversial procedure. Zach Helfand, The New Yorker, "The Complicated Ethics of Keeping a COVID-19 Patient Breathing," 22 Aug. 2020 Temporary breathing tubes placed through the mouth soon obviated surgical tracheostomy. Bradley M. Wertheim, Smithsonian Magazine, "How a Polio Outbreak in Copenhagen Led to the Invention of the Ventilator," 10 June 2020 Ibsen attached, to Vivi’s tracheostomy tube, a rubber bag filled with an oxygen supply. Bradley M. Wertheim, Smithsonian Magazine, "How a Polio Outbreak in Copenhagen Led to the Invention of the Ventilator," 10 June 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tracheostomy.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tracheostomy

circa 1923, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for tracheostomy

Time Traveler

The first known use of tracheostomy was circa 1923

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Cite this Entry

“Tracheostomy.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tracheostomy. Accessed 26 Feb. 2021.

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More Definitions for tracheostomy

tracheostomy

noun
tra·​che·​os·​to·​my | \ ˌtrā-kē-ˈäst-ə-mē How to pronounce tracheostomy (audio) \
plural tracheostomies

Medical Definition of tracheostomy

: the surgical formation of an opening into the trachea through the neck especially to allow the passage of air also : the opening itself

More from Merriam-Webster on tracheostomy

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about tracheostomy

Comments on tracheostomy

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