torque

1 of 3

noun (1)

1
: a force that produces or tends to produce rotation or torsion
an automobile engine delivers torque to the drive shaft
also : a measure of the effectiveness of such a force that consists of the product of the force and the perpendicular distance from the line of action of the force to the axis of rotation
2
: a turning or twisting force

torque

2 of 3

verb

torqued; torquing

transitive verb

: to impart torque to : cause to twist (as about an axis)
torquer noun

torque

3 of 3

noun (2)

variants or torc
: a usually metal collar or neck chain worn by the ancient Gauls, Germans, and Britons

Examples of torque in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
In addition, its engine gets tweaked up to 759 hp and 531 ft lbs of torque so that the car can hit 60 mph in less than 2.8 seconds and reach a top speed of 219 mph. Sean Evans, Robb Report, 2 Apr. 2024 Sports car owners in the ‘70s and early ‘80s would have killed to get 273 lb-ft of torque. Collin Woodard / Jalopnik, Quartz, 29 Mar. 2024 Despite having less power than before, the four-cylinder engine produces 180 horsepower and 178 pound feet of torque, with peak torque occurring at a lower rpm. Peter Lyon, Forbes, 28 Mar. 2024 The long-range single-motor version will put out 272 horsepower and 253 pound-feet of torque. Andrew J. Hawkins, The Verge, 27 Mar. 2024 The 23-kilowatt experimental GE motor was tested on a dynamometer using a torque meter—the gray, cylindrical item with the fins at left. IEEE Spectrum, 15 Mar. 2024 Under the hood lies a 4.3-liter V-8 capable of producing 200 hp and 251 ft lbs of torque. Rachel Cormack, Robb Report, 19 Mar. 2024 The Raptor gets a 3.0L twin-turbo V6 production 400 hp and 430 pound-feet of torque. Mark Phelan, Detroit Free Press, 19 Mar. 2024 The technical specs include a 2.5-liter I-4 GDI engine that produces 191 horsepower and 181 lb of torque, matched to an 8-speed automatic transmission. Dominique Fluker, Essence, 18 Mar. 2024
Verb
Headrests flew away, and frames were torqued on two seats, Homendy said. Gisele Lamarre, NBC News, 9 Jan. 2024 But an alternative is that Mimas' rocky core is oddly shaped, creating an opportunity for the gravitational pull of Saturn and the other moons to torque it somewhat differently each orbit. John Timmer, Ars Technica, 7 Feb. 2024 Hubble uses spinning reaction wheels to torque the spacecraft in large movements from one direction to another. Stephen Clark, Ars Technica, 8 Dec. 2023 Tork torques his torque Of course, not all the stats for the Tigers are bad. Ryan Ford, Detroit Free Press, 24 Apr. 2023 Yeah, these wheel guns are a cut above your average impact wrench that your local mechanic uses to torque your wheel lugs within an inch of their life. Matt Crisara, Popular Mechanics, 30 Mar. 2023 Dabiri says there is reason to expect the opposite, since wakes often hit rotors unevenly, torquing their components. IEEE Spectrum, 14 Mar. 2023 But in some cases the bolt that holds the steering wheel in place might not have been properly torqued. Jonathan M. Gitlin, Ars Technica, 13 Mar. 2023 Power is increased marginally, as well, from 402 hp (300 kW) to 416 hp (310 kW), and torque a little more substantially from 486 lb-ft (660 Nm) to 546 lb-ft (740 Nm). Jonathan M. Gitlin, Ars Technica, 24 Jan. 2023

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'torque.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Latin torquēre to twist

Noun (2)

French, from Latin torques, from torquēre to twist — more at torture entry 1

First Known Use

Noun (1)

circa 1884, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1959, in the meaning defined above

Noun (2)

1695, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of torque was in 1695

Dictionary Entries Near torque

Cite this Entry

“Torque.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/torque. Accessed 12 Apr. 2024.

Medical Definition

torque

1 of 2 noun
: a force that produces or tends to produce rotation or torsion
also : a measure of the effectiveness of such a force that consists of the product of the force and the perpendicular distance from the line of action of the force to the axis of rotation

torque

2 of 2 transitive verb
torqued; torquing
: to impart torque to : cause to twist (as a tooth about its long axis)
Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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