much

adjective
\ ˈməch How to pronounce much (audio) \
more\ ˈmȯr How to pronounce more (audio) \; most\ ˈmōst How to pronounce most (audio) \

Definition of much

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : great in quantity, amount, extent, or degree there is much truth in what you say taken too much time
b : great in importance or significance nothing much happened
2 obsolete : many in number
3 : more than is expected or acceptable : more than enough the large pizza is a bit much for one person
too much
1 : wonderful, exciting That rock concert was too much!

much

adverb
more; most

Definition of much (Entry 2 of 3)

1a(1) : to a great degree or extent : considerably much happier
(2) : very much gratified
b(1) : frequently, often
(2) : by or for a long time didn't get to work much before noon
c : by far was much the brightest student
2 : nearly, approximately looks much the way his father did
as much
1 : the same in quantity not quite as much money
2 : to the same degree

much

noun

Definition of much (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a great quantity, amount, extent, or degree She gave away much of what she owned
2 : something considerable or impressive was not much to look at

Keep scrolling for more

Synonyms & Antonyms for much

Synonyms: Adjective

big, consequential, earth-shattering, earthshaking, eventful, historic, important, major, material, meaningful, momentous, monumental, significant, substantial, tectonic, weighty

Synonyms: Adverb

achingly, almighty, archly, awful, awfully, badly, beastly, blisteringly, bone, colossally, corking, cracking, damn, damned, dang, deadly, desperately, eminently, enormously, especially, ever, exceedingly (also exceeding), extra, extremely, fabulously, fantastically, far, fiercely, filthy, frightfully, full, greatly, heavily, highly, hugely, immensely, incredibly, intensely, jolly, majorly, mightily, mighty, monstrous [chiefly dialect], mortally, most, particularly, passing, rattling, real, really, right, roaring, roaringly, seriously, severely, so, sore, sorely, spanking, specially, stinking, such, super, supremely, surpassingly, terribly, that, thumping, too, unco, uncommonly, vastly, very, vitally, way, whacking, wicked, wildly

Synonyms: Noun

abundance, barrel, basketful, boatload, bucket, bunch, bundle, bushel, carload, chunk, deal, dozen, fistful, gobs, good deal, heap, hundred, lashings (also lashins) [chiefly British], loads, lot, mass, mess, mountain, multiplicity, myriad, oodles, pack, passel, peck, pile, plateful, plenitude, plentitude, plenty, pot, potful, profusion, quantity, raft, reams, scads, sheaf, shipload, sight, slew, spate, stack, store, ton, truckload, volume, wad, wealth, yard

Antonyms: Adjective

inconsequential, inconsiderable, insignificant, little, minor, negligible, slight, small, trifling, trivial, unimportant

Antonyms: Adverb

little, negligibly, nominally, slightly, somewhat

Antonyms: Noun

ace, bit, dab, dram, driblet, glimmer, handful, hint, lick, little, mite, mouthful, nip, ounce, peanuts, pinch, pittance, scruple, shade, shadow, smidgen (also smidgeon), speck, spot, sprinkle, sprinkling, strain, streak, suspicion, tad, taste, touch, trace

Visit the Thesaurus for More 

Examples of much in a Sentence

Adverb

The new car is much better on gas mileage. They both talk too much. Thank you so much for your help. He is much interested in the project. They were much pleased by the compliment. She doesn't visit her family much. The town looks much the same. We came to much the same conclusion. We left the house much as we found it.

Noun

much of what people think they know about words is inaccurate or downright false
See More

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective

Then Sampras, who was seeded seventeenth, went on to win the tournament, defeating Andre Agassi in the final, stunning much of the tennis world. Gerald Marzorati, The New Yorker, "On a Day at Wimbledon When Serena Williams Didn’t Have It, Simona Halep Had It All," 13 July 2019 There will be questions all year long about how much Westbrook can adapt his game to thrive off the ball, whether this plan can work in the playoffs, and how successful Houston can be. Andrew Sharp, SI.com, "Russell Westbrook on the Rockets Is the NBA Offseason's Strangest Move," 12 July 2019 In Hartford’s mayoral race, incumbent Luke Bronin has raised 10 times as much money as former Mayor Eddie Perez, who is plotting a comeback after a corruption scandal forced him from office in 2010. Russell Blair, courant.com, "Capitol Week in Review: Lamont shakes up office, tolls vote remains elusive," 12 July 2019 Other days, even the shortest runs felt like too much to handle. Joelle Zarcone, SELF, "My Cooley’s Anemia Helps Me View Workouts as a Gift, Not a Chore," 12 July 2019 However, disagreements over when the line will begin carrying passengers — and who will pay how much to offset holdups and accelerate construction — will continue. Washington Post, "Maryland grants contractor a 5-month delay in Purple Line’s opening date," 11 July 2019 When media attention and misconceptions became too much, the riot grrrls declared a media blackout. Lisawhill, Longreads, "Live Through This: Courtney Love at 55," 9 July 2019 For a while, Democrats were torn on how much to raise wages. Alexia Fernández Campbell, Vox, "A $15 minimum wage could lift 1.3 million out of poverty — and cost 1.3 million jobs," 8 July 2019 But there is a significant amount of research on how much immigration can offset population aging in low-fertility countries such as the United States, and the answer is clear — not much. Steven Camarota, National Review, "Immigration Is No Fix for an Aging Society," 8 July 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Adverb

Sharks, though incredible predators, aren't much of a threat to humans. Erin Davis And Katherine Dillinger, CNN, "Shark Awareness Day facts to make you rethink 'Jaws'," 14 July 2019 The difference is that Mr. Trump successfully staged a hostile takeover of the Republican Party in 2016 and has since brought much of its old establishment to heel, driving the likes of Mr. Ryan out the door or into hiding. Peter Baker, New York Times, "Parties Face ‘Crackup’ as Outsiders Wield Social Media Against the Establishment," 13 July 2019 Mobutu Sese Seko, Congo’s post-independence dictator, gave plum posts to the Hema, who acquired much of Ituri’s finest land. The Economist, "Killings in Congo’s north-east spark fears of a return to war," 13 July 2019 In the early 1900s, workers cemented boundary monuments made of aluminum-bronze and standing 2.5-feet tall along much of the border’s length. Anchorage Daily News, "The thin line between Alaska and Canada," 13 July 2019 The county spent much of last year in conflict with Mitchell. oregonlive.com, "The trouble with tigers in America," 13 July 2019 Power went out at much of Rockefeller Center and reached the Upper West Side, according to the Associated Press. Olivia Sanchez, USA TODAY, "New York City power outage: Here's what we know about the widespread blackout," 13 July 2019 And how much should the women’s national soccer team get paid? Nr Staff, National Review, "A Series of Own Goals," 13 July 2019 Ten years ago, no one had successfully done much of note with deep learning. Kelsey Piper, Vox, "Playing StarCraft? You can now compete with an undercover AI," 12 July 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'much.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of much

Adjective

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Adverb

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for much

Adjective, Adverb, and Noun

Middle English muche large, much, from michel, muchel, from Old English micel, mycel; akin to Old High German mihhil great, large, Latin magnus, Greek megas, Sanskrit mahat

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about much

Statistics for much

Last Updated

16 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for much

The first known use of much was in the 13th century

See more words from the same century

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for much

much

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of much

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: large in amount or extent : not little

much

adverb

English Language Learners Definition of much (Entry 2 of 2)

: to a great degree or extent
: by a long time
: very nearly

much

adjective
\ ˈməch How to pronounce much (audio) \
more\ ˈmȯr \; most\ ˈmōst \

Kids Definition of much

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : great in amount or extent It took much effort.
2 : great in importance Nothing much happened today.
3 : more than enough That pizza is a bit much for one person.

much

adverb
more; most

Kids Definition of much (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : to a great or high level or extent He's much happier.
2 : just about : nearly She looks much the same.

much

noun

Kids Definition of much (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : a great amount or part Much that was said is true.
2 : something important or impressive It's not much to look at.

Keep scrolling for more

More from Merriam-Webster on much

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with much

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for much

Spanish Central: Translation of much

Nglish: Translation of much for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of much for Arabic Speakers

Comments on much

What made you want to look up much? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

to complain fretfully

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Test Your Vocabulary

What's that Smell?! Quiz

  • wide eyed dog smelling rose
  • Someone who is hircine smells like a:
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
SCRABBLE® Sprint

Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!