terroir

noun

ter·​roir ˌter-ˈwär How to pronounce terroir (audio)
: the combination of factors including soil, climate, and sunlight that gives wine grapes their distinctive character

Examples of terroir in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web Buy Now: $105 Tenuta Luce 2018 Brunello di Montalcino Tuscany Italy Named for the bright sun in Montalcino, Tenuta Luce is currently run by Lamberto Frescobaldi and concentrates on making fine wines with the utmost respect for the terroir. Mike Desimone and Jeff Jenssen, Robb Report, 22 Feb. 2024 But haute cuisine has just as much claim to the sentiment; both styles have their own rich history, born from and steeped in the same terroir. Jamie Schler, Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 If terroir can shape a whiskey, this one evokes the gentle, welcoming Hudson Valley. Florence Fabricant, New York Times, 8 Jan. 2024 Then, a parade of other courses, notable for their sense of terroir and presentation. Hannah Selinger, Travel + Leisure, 20 Sep. 2023 The wine is aged almost exclusively in stainless steel, to preserve all that terroir, so there’s bright lemon blossom and almond on the nose, with a rich mouthfeel redolent of peaches, followed by a long toasty finish. Jeanne O'Brien Coffey, Forbes, 12 Feb. 2024 From classic French elegance to bold global expressions, each pour promises a journey through unique terroirs. Brittany Delay, The Mercury News, 5 Jan. 2024 Tequila Ocho Blanco Ocho was among the first tequila brands to experiment with terroir on a large scale. Jason O'Bryan, Robb Report, 11 Nov. 2023 Sourced from all over Vietnam, each herb and spice carries its own unique tasting notes based on the terroir of each region. Anna Haines, Forbes, 11 Dec. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'terroir.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

French, land, country, stretch of land in reference to its agricultural features, from Old French tieroir, from Vulgar Latin *terratorium, alteration of Latin territorium

First Known Use

1863, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of terroir was in 1863

Dictionary Entries Near terroir

Cite this Entry

“Terroir.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/terroir. Accessed 1 Mar. 2024.

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