biscuit

noun
bis·​cuit | \ˈbi-skət \
plural biscuits also biscuit

Definition of biscuit 

1a US : a small quick bread made from dough that has been rolled out and cut or dropped from a spoon While both types of biscuit use the same handful of ingredients and are quick to prepare, drop biscuits don't rely on any of the finicky steps rolled biscuits require to get them just right.— Sandra Wu

b British : cookie The children were divided into groups of five seated round a table and each one was given a chocolate biscuit.— H. Colin Davis

2 : earthenware or porcelain after the first firing and before glazing biscuit china

called also bisque

3a : a light grayish-yellowish brown

b : a grayish yellow

4 woodworking : a small, flat oval of compressed wood that is glued into slots cut into the sides of two boards which are to be joined in order to increase the strength of the resulting bond Have several clamps at the ready; then add glue to the biscuits, push them into the maple slots, and clamp the maple in place. The dry, compressed biscuits swell once glue is applied, so you have to work quickly.— Mike McClintock — compare tenon entry 1

5 slang : a hockey puck To control the biscuit, you've got to win faceoffs.— Lindsay Berra

take the biscuit
British, informal

: to win the prize : to rank first often used to describe something that is extremely surprising, annoying, etc. When he was quite sure that the narrative had ended he laughed noiselessly for fully half a minute. Then he said: "Well! … That takes the biscuit!" [=(US) takes the cake]— James Joyce

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Other Words from biscuit

biscuity \ˈbi-​skə-​tē \ adjective

Did You Know?

Long ago it was often a problem to keep food from spoiling, especially on long journeys. One way to preserve flat loaves of bread was to bake them a second time in order to dry them out. In early French, this bread was called pain bescuit or “bread twice-cooked.” Later the term was shortened to bescuit. The idea of being “twice–cooked” was lost as the term was used for any crisp flat bread or for bread made with baking soda or baking powder instead of yeast. The word was borrowed into Middle English as bisquite, but was later spelled biscuit on the model of the French spelling.

Examples of biscuit in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web

His fried chicken, meanwhile, takes on a Southern charm with golden biscuits and crab macaroni and cheese. Mike Sutter, WSJ, "The Best Under-the-Radar Food Destination in the U.S.," 19 Oct. 2018 Reroll the scraps once and cut additional biscuits. Cathy Barrow, The Seattle Times, "I bake for dogs, and they eat it up: recipes for DIY dog biscuits," 23 July 2018 Fork in the Road makes good biscuits to serve with breakfast platters and sandwiches, but the breakfast menu is just getting started. Bud Kennedy, star-telegram, "Don't be fuzzy about the date and time of the big Parker County Peach Festival," 4 July 2018 And, manufacturer Flowers Foods makes frozen biscuits for several brands. David J. Neal, miamiherald, "Listeria causes the second coast-to-coast biscuit recall in a month," 12 Jan. 2018 With floured 2 1⁄2-inch cutter, cut out biscuits without twisting cutter. The Good Housekeeping Test Kitchen, Good Housekeeping, "Best-Ever Buttermilk Biscuits," 21 Mar. 2016 Cut 16 biscuits with a two-inch plain round cutter and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Ina Garten, House Beautiful, "Ina's Deconstructed Strawberry Shortcake," 1 Jan. 2010 Overall, Campbell’s comparable sales fell 3%, as sales of its global biscuits and snacks were flat from the prior year, dampened by a recall of some Pepperidge Farm Goldfish crackers. Cara Lombardo, WSJ, "Campbell Soup to Sell International Business and Fresh Unit," 30 Aug. 2018 Before there was a big brunch scene in Charleston, there was Robert Stehling and his Charleston Nasty biscuit, and that, along with his shrimp and grits, perfectly fried okra, collards, and fried catfish, is as on point as ever. Stephanie Burt, Condé Nast Traveler, "28 Best Restaurants in Charleston," 2 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'biscuit.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of biscuit

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1b

History and Etymology for biscuit

Middle English bisquite, from Anglo-French besquit, from (pain) besquit twice-cooked bread

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Statistics for biscuit

Last Updated

7 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for biscuit

The first known use of biscuit was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for biscuit

biscuit

noun

English Language Learners Definition of biscuit

: a small, light roll that is eaten as part of a meal

biscuit

noun
bis·​cuit | \ˈbi-skət \

Kids Definition of biscuit

: a small light bread

biscuit

noun
bis·​cuit | \ˈbis-kət \

Medical Definition of biscuit 

: porcelain after the first firing and before glazing

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More from Merriam-Webster on biscuit

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with biscuit

Spanish Central: Translation of biscuit

Nglish: Translation of biscuit for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of biscuit for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about biscuit

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