superstition

noun
su·​per·​sti·​tion | \ ˌsü-pər-ˈsti-shən How to pronounce superstition (audio) \

Definition of superstition

1a : a belief or practice resulting from ignorance, fear of the unknown, trust in magic or chance, or a false conception of causation
b : an irrational abject attitude of mind toward the supernatural, nature, or God resulting from superstition
2 : a notion maintained despite evidence to the contrary

Examples of superstition in a Sentence

It is a common superstition that a black cat crossing your path is bad luck. tales of superstition, witchcraft, and magic
Recent Examples on the Web Writers were happy to note the superstition, either to goose it along or knock it down. Washington Post, 31 May 2021 The answer came without hesitation but also with superstition. Jeremy Price, The Indianapolis Star, 17 May 2021 While caution and restrictive behavior can be justified by a conscience informed by the risks, the human mind can also make calculations based on superstition. Michael Brendan Dougherty, National Review, 3 May 2021 People in the Muslim-majority country, from remote villagers to senior politicians, often rely on faith and superstition to understand current events. Mike Ives And Muktita Suhartono New York Times, Star Tribune, 27 Apr. 2021 For those inclined to superstition, the error might seem like an omen—a foretelling of bigger mix-ups to come. Longreads, 9 Apr. 2021 The standard narrative of the Enlightenment usually takes the form either of science unshackling the world from faith and superstition or of cold reason leading to disenchantment. The New Yorker, 15 Mar. 2021 Isolated superstition or fanaticism alone did not motivate this violence. Peter Keough, BostonGlobe.com, 17 Mar. 2021 Romulus lost, and wearing a suit became a superstition for the young coach. Mike Rodak | Mrodak@al.com, al, 19 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'superstition.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of superstition

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for superstition

Middle English supersticion, from Anglo-French, from Latin superstition-, superstitio, from superstit-, superstes standing over (as witness or survivor), from super- + stare to stand — more at stand

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Time Traveler for superstition

Time Traveler

The first known use of superstition was in the 13th century

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Statistics for superstition

Last Updated

5 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Superstition.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/superstition. Accessed 24 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for superstition

superstition

noun

English Language Learners Definition of superstition

: a belief or way of behaving that is based on fear of the unknown and faith in magic or luck : a belief that certain events or things will bring good or bad luck

superstition

noun
su·​per·​sti·​tion | \ ˌsü-pər-ˈsti-shən How to pronounce superstition (audio) \

Kids Definition of superstition

: a belief or practice resulting from ignorance, fear of the unknown, or trust in magic or chance It's a superstition that the number 13 is unlucky.

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