superstition

noun
su·​per·​sti·​tion | \ ˌsü-pər-ˈsti-shən How to pronounce superstition (audio) \

Definition of superstition

1a : a belief or practice resulting from ignorance, fear of the unknown, trust in magic or chance, or a false conception of causation
b : an irrational abject attitude of mind toward the supernatural, nature, or God resulting from superstition
2 : a notion maintained despite evidence to the contrary

Examples of superstition in a Sentence

It is a common superstition that a black cat crossing your path is bad luck. tales of superstition, witchcraft, and magic
Recent Examples on the Web That the best find of a trip will be on the last afternoon of the last day is a common paleo superstition. Riley Black, Smithsonian Magazine, 7 July 2022 Sailors, no strangers to superstition, clung to these beliefs, and even modern expedition leaders adhered to this tradition of excluding females. Catherine Musemeche, Smithsonian Magazine, 7 July 2022 There seemed to be an air of superstition to the streak for Marte. José M. Romero, The Arizona Republic, 5 June 2022 As much as the Wings longed for the Stanley Cup, their first order of business was to win — but not touch, according to superstition — the Clarence Campbell Bowl, awarded to the Western champion since expansion in 1967-68. Gene Myers, Detroit Free Press, 24 May 2022 Her catalog of the discriminatory rules (both official and informal) predating Title IX now seems closer to medieval superstition than 20th-century reality. Kay S. Hymowitz, WSJ, 2 May 2022 Sometimes the ball decisions players make are based on superstition. Sam Farmer, Los Angeles Times, 7 July 2022 Elevators skipped from floor 12 to floor 14 due to superstition. Ben Flanagan | Bflanagan@al.com, al, 4 July 2022 The IndyStar reached out to every team participating in this year’s 500 and the rationales ranged from superstition to tradition to none at all. Wilson Moore, The Indianapolis Star, 25 May 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'superstition.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of superstition

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for superstition

Middle English supersticion, from Anglo-French, from Latin superstition-, superstitio, from superstit-, superstes standing over (as witness or survivor), from super- + stare to stand — more at stand

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Time Traveler for superstition

Time Traveler

The first known use of superstition was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near superstition

superstimulate

superstition

superstitionist

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Statistics for superstition

Last Updated

4 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Superstition.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/superstition. Accessed 11 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for superstition

superstition

noun
su·​per·​sti·​tion | \ ˌsü-pər-ˈsti-shən How to pronounce superstition (audio) \

Kids Definition of superstition

: a belief or practice resulting from ignorance, fear of the unknown, or trust in magic or chance It's a superstition that the number 13 is unlucky.

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