superheat

1 of 2

verb

su·​per·​heat ˌsü-pər-ˈhēt How to pronounce superheat (audio)
superheated; superheating; superheats

transitive verb

1
: to heat (a vapor not in contact with its own liquid) so as to cause to remain free from suspended liquid droplets
superheated steam
2
: to heat (a liquid) above the boiling point without converting into vapor
superheater noun

superheat

2 of 2

noun

su·​per·​heat ˈsü-pər-ˌhēt How to pronounce superheat (audio)
ˌsü-pər-ˈhēt
: the extra heat imparted to a vapor in superheating it from a dry and saturated condition
also : the corresponding rise of temperature

Examples of superheat in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
Scientists suspect that magnetic reconnection superheats the coronal plasma, and small-scale phenomena such as the jetlets or related phenomena called nano flares might play a role. Rebecca Boyle, Scientific American, 20 Feb. 2024 The use of fly ash as a feedstock eliminates the need to use limestone at all, let alone to superheat it. Erik Kobayashi-Solomon, Forbes, 13 Nov. 2023 Insects bask in the sunlight to superheat their bodies and cook invading organisms; humans do the same by running a fever. Jeff Goodell, Time, 6 July 2023 This superheats this material—mostly gas in the form of plasma—to temperatures of millions of degrees. Robert Lea, Popular Mechanics, 13 June 2023 Such a large amount of mass in such a small volume causes extraordinary gravitational forces, which in turn accelerate galaxies to speeds of millions of kilometres per hour and superheat the plasma that permeates the cluster to millions of degrees Celsius. Toby Brown, CNN, 10 Dec. 2021 A billion years later the core will superheat to 180 million degrees Fahrenheit and begin rapidly burning helium, fusing it into carbon and oxygen. Brian T. Jacobs, National Geographic, 24 Aug. 2021 The reverse shock wave will continue to superheat the cool iron atoms, eventually reaching the remnant’s core sometime in the next few hundred years. Sarah Scoles, Discover Magazine, 4 Apr. 2014 National Ignition facility, scientists use lasers to help superheat and compress tiny pellets containing hydrogen atoms. Aylin Woodward, WSJ, 13 Dec. 2022
Noun
Auroras, usually between 62 and 186 miles above Earth's surface, are formed when streams of solar wind pass around the planet's magnetic field and superheat gases, which then glow in the night sky. Camille Fine, USA TODAY, 13 Nov. 2022 Today Saudi Arabian engineers plan to build a plant with giant mirrors that concentrate sunlight and superheat water within a steel-and-glass dome more than 50 meters across. Prachi Patel, Scientific American, 26 Jan. 2021 Maars appear when magma mixes explosively with groundwater, triggering eruptions of fresh volcanic material, or when hot rock superheats this water, creating bursts of steam that fling rock into the sky. Robin George Andrews, National Geographic, 12 Sep. 2019 Turn the water off, then wait six to eight weeks as the soil superheats to kill the grass and weeds. Nan Sterman, sandiegouniontribune.com, 3 Aug. 2017

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'superheat.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

Verb

1849, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

1852, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of superheat was in 1849

Dictionary Entries Near superheat

Cite this Entry

“Superheat.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/superheat. Accessed 28 May. 2024.

Kids Definition

superheat

verb
su·​per·​heat
ˌsü-pər-ˈhēt
1
a
: to heat (steam) to a higher temperature than the normal boiling point of water
b
: to heat a liquid above the boiling point without converting into vapor
2
: to heat very much or excessively

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