suck

verb
\ ˈsək How to pronounce suck (audio) \
sucked; sucking; sucks

Definition of suck

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to draw (something, such as liquid) into the mouth through a suction force produced by movements of the lips and tongue sucked milk from his mother's breast
b : to draw something from or consume by such movements suck an orange suck a lollipop
c : to apply the mouth to in order to or as if to suck out a liquid sucked his burned finger
2a : to draw by or as if by suction when a receding wave sucks the sand from under your feet— Kenneth Brower inadvertently sucked into the … intrigue— Martin Levin
b : to take in and consume by or as if by suction a vacuum cleaner sucking up dirt suck up a few beers opponents say that malls suck the life out of downtown areas— Michael Knight

intransitive verb

1 : to draw something in by or as if by exerting a suction force especially : to draw milk from a breast or udder with the mouth
2 : to make a sound or motion associated with or caused by suction his pipe sucked wetly flanks sucked in and out, the long nose resting on his paws— Virginia Woolf
3 : to act in an obsequious manner when they want votes … the candidates come sucking around— W. G. Hardy usually used with up sucked up to the boss
4 slang, sometimes vulgar : to be objectionable or inadequate our lifestyle sucksPlayboy people who went said it sucked— H. S. Thompson
suck it up
: to make the effort required to do or deal with something difficult or unpleasant

suck

noun

Definition of suck (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a sucking movement or force
2 : the act of sucking

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Synonyms & Antonyms for suck

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of suck in a Sentence

Verb sucking milk through a straw a toddler sucking his thumb She just sucked her teeth and stared. She sucked on an orange slice. I sucked a cough drop. The tide almost sucked us out to sea. The boat was sucked under the water in the storm. These plants suck moisture from the soil. The fan sucks smoke from the air. a vacuum cleaner that sucks up water as well as dirt Noun He took a suck on his pipe.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Its core business is working with landowners to parcel together tracts of forests, whose ability to suck up carbon dioxide can be sold off as carbon credits, including a third of those generated under California’s cap-and-trade system. Kate Aronoff, The New Republic, "BP’s Suspicious Support for a Carbon Market in Washington State," 6 May 2021 Instead of a rubber bulb at the end that is squeezed and released to suck up liquid, pipette tips attach to a micropipette apparatus that the scientist can set to pick up a specific volume of liquid, usually measured in microliters. Theresa Machemer, Smithsonian Magazine, "A Shortage of Plastic Pipette Tips Is Delaying Biology Research," 30 Apr. 2021 To form the perfect ponytail using a vacuum, slip a hairband around the end of the nozzle and then suck up all your hair from the back. Jeff Harper, chicagotribune.com, "Creative things you can do with a vacuum," 6 Mar. 2021 Among the most ambitious are the backers of a process known as direct air capture, through which giant fans suck carbon from the atmosphere. Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times, "Clock’s running out on climate change. California says it’s time for giant carbon vacuums," 19 Apr. 2021 Writing in Bloomberg Green, Leslie Kaufman and Akshat Rathi offer a darkly funny account of an entrepreneur’s efforts to suck carbon from the atmosphere. Bill Mckibben, The New Yorker, "No More Halfsies on Climate," 14 Apr. 2021 In another, new technologies will simply suck all the excess carbon from the air. Kate Aronoff, The New Republic, "Can OPEC Rescue the Planet?," 22 Mar. 2021 Found by a team at Check Point Research, this app has been lurking in the Google Play Store, used Netflix imagery to suck people in, and promised to allow users to view Netflix content from all around the world on their smartphones. Andy Meek, BGR, "This Android app spreads malware, so delete it right now if you have it," 7 Apr. 2021 One user even suggested a foolproof method for deep-cleaning your blinds using this duster brush, starting with a quick sweep of the vacuum to suck up any loose dust. Kaitlyn Yarborough, Southern Living, "This Window Blind Duster Brush with Nearly 10,000 Amazon Reviews Is the Easiest Trick To Cleaning Dirty Blinds," 31 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Maybe that explains one of the Washington women’s rowing team’s mottos this year: Embrace the suck. Matt Calkins, The Seattle Times, "Washington’s Triple Crown in rowing well earned," 29 May 2017 While these are technically DOT legal, FCA points out that the meats wear quickly on the highway, suck in the rain, and should not, under any circumstances, be used in any way, shape, or form at temperatures below 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Davey G. Johnson, Car and Driver, "Dodge Demands Owners Sign Waiver When Ordering Demon," 23 June 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'suck.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of suck

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for suck

Verb

Middle English suken, from Old English sūcan; akin to Old High German sūgan to suck, Latin sugere

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Time Traveler for suck

Time Traveler

The first known use of suck was before the 12th century

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Statistics for suck

Last Updated

9 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Suck.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/suck. Accessed 10 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for suck

suck

verb

English Language Learners Definition of suck

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to pull (liquid, air, etc.) into your mouth especially while your lips are forming a small hole
: to pull on (something in your mouth) with the muscles of your lips and mouth
: to let (something, such as candy or medicine) stay in your mouth as it melts

suck

noun

English Language Learners Definition of suck (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act of sucking

suck

verb
\ ˈsək How to pronounce suck (audio) \
sucked; sucking

Kids Definition of suck

1 : to draw something (as liquid or air) into the mouth He sucked chocolate milk through a straw.
2 : to draw liquid from by action of the mouth He sucked an orange.
3 : to allow to dissolve gradually in the mouth suck a lollipop
4 : to put (as a thumb) into the mouth and draw on as if drawing liquid
5 : to take in by or as if by absorption or suction Plants suck moisture from the soil.
\ ˈsək How to pronounce suck (audio) \

Medical Definition of suck

1 : to draw (as liquid) into the mouth through a suction force produced by movements of the lips and tongue sucked milk from her mother's breast
2 : to draw out by suction

intransitive verb

: to draw something in by or as if by exerting a suction force especially : to draw milk from a breast or udder with the mouth

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More from Merriam-Webster on suck

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for suck

Nglish: Translation of suck for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of suck for Arabic Speakers

Comments on suck

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