subdue

verb
sub·​due | \ səb-ˈdü How to pronounce subdue (audio) , -ˈdyü\
subdued; subduing

Definition of subdue

transitive verb

1 : to conquer and bring into subjection : vanquish
2 : to bring under control especially by an exertion of the will : curb subdued my foolish fears
3 : to bring (land) under cultivation
4 : to reduce the intensity or degree of : tone down

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Other Words from subdue

subduer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for subdue

conquer, vanquish, defeat, subdue, reduce, overcome, overthrow mean to get the better of by force or strategy. conquer implies gaining mastery of. Caesar conquered Gaul vanquish implies a complete overpowering. vanquished the enemy and ended the war defeat does not imply the finality or completeness of vanquish which it otherwise equals. the Confederates defeated the Union forces at Manassas subdue implies a defeating and suppression. subdued the native tribes after years of fighting reduce implies a forcing to capitulate or surrender. the city was reduced after a month-long siege overcome suggests getting the better of with difficulty or after hard struggle. overcame a host of bureaucratic roadblocks overthrow stresses the bringing down or destruction of existing power. violently overthrew the old regime

Examples of subdue in a Sentence

The troops were finally able to subdue the rebel forces after many days of fighting. He was injured while trying to subdue a violent drunk. She struggled to subdue her fears.
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Recent Examples on the Web

They are heavily favored to subdue the Dutch, who, in their second World Cup, have made remarkable gains as a program but would need to play an almost-perfect game here. Steven Goff, The Denver Post, "“Locked on and still hungry,” USA soccer enters World Cup final aware of its legacy," 6 July 2019 Her horse was startled but the queen, in a remarkable display of her sangfroid and horsewoman’s skills, quickly kept him under control and kept on riding as police rushed behind her to subdue the gunman. Sara M Moniuszko, USA TODAY, "Duchess Meghan attends Trooping the Colour after skipping Trump visit, Prince Louis makes balcony debut," 8 June 2019 Once rail construction got under way, the 11,000-foot Cerro de la Muerte, or Mountain of Death, in Costa Rica took years to subdue. Charles R. Morris, WSJ, "‘The Longest Line on the Map’ Review: The End of the Road," 8 Jan. 2019 Meripet's family is among tens of thousands swept up in President Xi Jinping's campaign to subdue a sometimes restive region, including the internment of more than one million Uighurs and other Muslim minorities. Yanan Wang And Dake Kang, Fox News, "China distances children from families to subdue Muslim west," 21 Sep. 2018 The internet monitoring organization NetBlocks said platforms including WhatsApp, Instagram, and Facebook were blocked to subdue the protests. Abdi Latif Dahir, Quartz Africa, "Liberia has blocked social media as protesters demand the return of missing millions," 7 June 2019 Deputies were twice unsuccessful in using a Taser to subdue the man, and a deputy fired a shot at him, Abbott said. Asia Fields, The Seattle Times, "Armed man arrested after barricading himself in White Center Subway," 5 Feb. 2019 They can be used as a starting point when building an outfit, and are always guaranteed to subdue a more colorful pairing. Christian Allaire, Vogue, "Lupita Nyong’o Matched Her Entire Outfit to Her Disco Ball Heels," 11 Jan. 2019 An easterly 10-15 mph fetch, combined with clouds and (potentially) impending rain, keep temperatures subdued in the 70s. Washington Post, "D.C.-area forecast: Warm but rather cloudy with a shower or two around through the weekend," 8 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'subdue.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of subdue

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for subdue

Middle English sodewen, subduen, from Anglo-French soduire, subdure to lead astray, overcome, arrest (influenced in form and meaning by Latin subdere to subject), from Latin subducere to withdraw, remove stealthily

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Dictionary Entries near subdue

subduable

subdual

subduction

subdue

subdued

subduedness

subdural

Statistics for subdue

Last Updated

11 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for subdue

The first known use of subdue was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for subdue

subdue

verb

English Language Learners Definition of subdue

: to get control of (a violent or dangerous person or group) by using force, punishment, etc.
: to get control of (something, such as a strong emotion)

subdue

verb
sub·​due | \ səb-ˈdü How to pronounce subdue (audio) , -ˈdyü\
subdued; subduing

Kids Definition of subdue

1 : to bring under control He subdued his fears. Police subdued the angry man.
2 : to overcome in battle Troops subdued the enemy.

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More from Merriam-Webster on subdue

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with subdue

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for subdue

Spanish Central: Translation of subdue

Nglish: Translation of subdue for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of subdue for Arabic Speakers

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