stereopsis

noun
ste·​re·​op·​sis | \ ˌster-ē-ˈäp-səs How to pronounce stereopsis (audio) , ˌstir- \

Definition of stereopsis

: stereoscopic vision

Examples of stereopsis in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The researchers wanted to determine whether the cuttlefish employ stereopsis, a process to perceive depth by using visual information captured by each eye. Ryan W. Miller, USA TODAY, "Why scientists put 3D glasses on cuttlefish and showed them images of shrimp," 9 Jan. 2020 The researchers were able to determine that cuttlefish can account for the differences between what their eyes see using computations in the brain — known as stereopsis — and consequently adjust their position in the tank in real time. CBS News, "Scientists put 3D glasses on cuttlefish and played movie clips. Here's what they discovered," 9 Jan. 2020 This visual trick, called stereopsis or stereo vision, requires complex coordination between the eyes and the brain, and it was once thought to be unique to vertebrates. Katherine J. Wu, Smithsonian Magazine, "Scientists Velcroed 3-D Glasses to Cuttlefish to Study Their Depth Perception," 8 Jan. 2020 Known as stereopsis, the trick takes a lot of processing power—and scientists didn’t think many animals had enough brains to do it. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Praying Mantises Don Tiny Goggles to Help Us Understand 3-D Vision," 10 Feb. 2018 Karin Nordstrom at Flinders University tells Yong that this study raises the possibility that other predator insects including robber flies and dragonflies also use stereopsis. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Praying Mantises Don Tiny Goggles to Help Us Understand 3-D Vision," 10 Feb. 2018 In humans, this effect would have fried our stereopsis, preventing us from aligning the two pictures. Jason Daley, Smithsonian, "Praying Mantises Don Tiny Goggles to Help Us Understand 3-D Vision," 10 Feb. 2018 The idea seemed odd, since insect eyes evolved independently from people and stereopsis was assumed to be a characteristic of mammals with forward-facing eyes. National Geographic, "These Praying Mantises Wear Tiny 3-D Glasses—For Science," 28 Apr. 2017 Animals that see in stereopsis use small differences in an object’s location perceived by the right and left eye to calculate how far away the object is. National Geographic, "These Praying Mantises Wear Tiny 3-D Glasses—For Science," 28 Apr. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stereopsis.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stereopsis

circa 1911, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for stereopsis

New Latin, from stere- + Greek opsis vision, appearance — more at optic

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Time Traveler for stereopsis

Time Traveler

The first known use of stereopsis was circa 1911

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Cite this Entry

“Stereopsis.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/stereopsis. Accessed 30 Nov. 2020.

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More Definitions for stereopsis

stereopsis

noun
ste·​re·​op·​sis | \ ˌster-ē-ˈäp-səs, ˌstir- How to pronounce stereopsis (audio) \

Medical Definition of stereopsis

: stereoscopic vision

Comments on stereopsis

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