squall

1 of 4

verb (1)

squalled; squalling; squalls

intransitive verb

: to cry out raucously : scream

transitive verb

: to utter in a strident voice
squaller noun

squall

2 of 4

noun (1)

: a raucous cry

squall

3 of 4

noun (2)

1
: a sudden violent wind often with rain or snow
2
: a short-lived commotion

squall

4 of 4

verb (2)

squalled; squalling; squalls

intransitive verb

: to blow a squall

Examples of squall in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Birder braves storm winds, gets record sighting After securing his home and realizing the worst of Idalia was past his community, Bouton headed out to try his luck for unusual birds that might arrive with the hurricane's strong offshore winds and bands of squall lines. Dinah Voyles Pulver, USA TODAY, 4 Sep. 2023 These wind events arise when storms form a continuous and narrow band of thunderstorms ahead of a cold front, also called a squall line, CNN reported. Emma Tucker, CNN, 27 Feb. 2023 The lighthouse offers a view of both Providence and Boston, and no doubt is a comfort to vessels navigating dangerous squalls in nearby Cocasset Lake. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, 10 Sep. 2023 Photo: andy buchanan/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images The wind business, viewed by governments as key to meeting climate targets and boosting electricity supplies, is facing a dangerous market squall. Mari Novik, WSJ, 7 Aug. 2023 That’s the second-highest level of risk for thunderstorms and is usually reserved for days when several supercells produce intense tornadoes, large hail or destructive squall lines with widespread damaging winds. Molly Fellin Spence, Baltimore Sun, 14 Aug. 2023 Numerous storms — perhaps consolidating into a squall line — are probable in the 5 to 10 p.m. window, and some could well become severe — with multiple potential hazards including flooding rain, frequent lightning, damaging winds and hail. Jason Samenow, Washington Post, 7 Aug. 2023 Today’s winter storm hazards will include heavy snow squalls, with 12 to 24 inches of snow slated for the Lake Tahoe area and Yosemite Village. Gerry Díaz, San Francisco Chronicle, 28 Feb. 2023 This will then quickly transition into a damaging wind event this evening and into the overnight hours as the storms form into a squall line, which is a continuous and narrow band of thunderstorms that form ahead of a cold front. Haley Brink, CNN, 26 Feb. 2023
Verb
Black Francis still shrieked, Joey Santiago’s guitar still squalled, Lenchantin’s bass still offered a choppy plunk, and the bam-thwok of David Lovering’s drums still kept the chaos anchored. Marc Hirsh, BostonGlobe.com, 9 June 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'squall.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb (1)

probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse skval useless chatter

Noun (2)

probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Swedish skval rushing water

First Known Use

Verb (1)

circa 1631, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun (1)

1709, in the meaning defined above

Noun (2)

1699, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

circa 1890, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of squall was circa 1631

Dictionary Entries Near squall

Cite this Entry

“Squall.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/squall. Accessed 1 Oct. 2023.

Kids Definition

squall

1 of 4 verb
: to cry out with a harsh sound : scream
squaller noun

squall

2 of 4 noun
: a harsh cry or scream

squall

3 of 4 noun
1
: a sudden violent wind often with rain or snow
2
: a short-lived commotion

squall

4 of 4 verb
: to blow as a squall

More from Merriam-Webster on squall

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