spout

verb
\ ˈspau̇t How to pronounce spout (audio) \
spouted; spouting; spouts

Definition of spout

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to eject (liquid) in a stream wells spouting oil
2a : to speak or utter readily, volubly, and at length
b : to speak or utter in a pompous or oratorical manner : declaim a candidate spouting empty promises

intransitive verb

1 : to issue with force or in a jet : spurt
2 : to eject material (such as liquid) in a jet

spout

noun

Definition of spout (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a pipe or conductor through which a liquid is discharged or conveyed in a stream: such as
a : a pipe for carrying rainwater from a roof
b : a projecting tube or lip from which a liquid (such as water) issues
2 : a discharge or jet of liquid or moisture from or as if from a pipe: such as
b : the blowing of a whale
3 archaic : pawnshop

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Other Words from spout

Verb

spouter noun

Noun

spouted \ ˈspau̇-​təd How to pronounce spouted (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for spout

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of spout in a Sentence

Verb The well was spouting oil. She kept spouting on and on about politics. Noun Water was flowing from the spout. the spout of a tea kettle
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Now, the Sergeants Benevolent Association’s official Twitter account spends most of its time needling New York City Mayor De Blasio and spouting profanity and pro-Trump propaganda. Kim Kelly, The New Republic, "No More Cop Unions," 29 May 2020 If Russia wants to spread disinformation, the president continually softens an audience for it, by instructing the public to disregard authoritative journalism as the prevarications of a traitorous elite and by spouting falsehoods on Twitter. Franklin Foer, The Atlantic, "The 2016 Election Was Just a Dry Run," 11 May 2020 But the truth is that breweries have become quite comfortable with spouting their politics — especially lefty politics here in Chicago. Chicago Tribune Staff, chicagotribune.com, "Daywatch: Prosecutors describe wild shootouts with suspect, strike vote for CPS teachers begins and other things to know about to start your day," 24 Sep. 2019 But the pilot’s been too busy blaming the clouds and spouting lies over the loudspeaker. Deborah Copaken, The Atlantic, "My Whole Household Has COVID-19," 27 Mar. 2020 After the White House accused him of spouting Nazi propaganda, Lindbergh resigned his commission as a colonel in the U.S. Air Corps Reserve. oregonlive, "President Charles Lindbergh leads a fascist administration in ‘Plot Against America,’ but real Lindy was ‘rather inept’ as politician," 27 Mar. 2020 Again, some of this might sound attractive: too many civil servants live in a Whitehall bubble and too many managers overpay themselves for spouting claptrap. The Economist, "Jeremy Corbyn’s political agenda is more radical than his economic one," 30 Nov. 2019 Her work challenges the nationalist myths being spouted by a growing number of would-be despots across Europe, including in her native Poland. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, "The Nobel Prize in Literature Is Just Trolling Now," 10 Oct. 2019 So here’s what’s what: Ken, Joel, Robin Thicke, Jenny McCarthy Wahlberg and Nicole Scherzinger are here to spout out their usual nonsense while four of the remaining eight contestants take part in two separate showdowns. Robbie Daw, Billboard, "'The Masked Singer' Recap: Flower Plucked From The Competition," 21 Nov. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The spout of the coffeepot marks the bow and arrow and the dipper shape forms his body. Dean Regas, Cincinnati.com, "Things to look for in the night sky this summer 🌌," 10 June 2020 Come late winter or early spring, as the sap rises, it can be collected by drilling holes in the trunks and inserting a spout to funnel the sap into containers. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "Artificial “tongue” for maple syrup weeds out batches with “buddy” off flavors," 28 May 2020 Tilt your head sideways over the sink and have the spout of the pot pour the solution through your nose. Adele Jackson-gibson, Good Housekeeping, "9 Most Effective Natural Remedies to Treat Seasonal Allergies, According to Experts," 24 Mar. 2020 While there are several styles from which to choose, opting for one with a gooseneck spout allows for precision pouring. Billy Cadden, Popular Science, "The best electric gooseneck kettles," 31 Jan. 2020 Strain mixture through a fine mesh sieve into a large glass measuring cup with spout and then divide mixture evenly among ramekins. Kim Sunée, Anchorage Daily News, "Toasted black sesame seeds give this Italian classic a nuttier flavor," 6 Dec. 2019 Under the spout, there is a black-and-white outline of a water bottle, a visual cue that users must supply their own vessel. Jennifer Maloney, WSJ, "Coke and Pepsi Want to Sell You Bottled Water Without the Bottle," 21 June 2019 The nonorganics spout was blowing out mostly wispy bits of plastic. Rivka Galchen, The New Yorker, "How South Korea Is Composting Its Way to Sustainability," 2 Mar. 2020 The spout is designed to prevent drip-back, help control the speed of your pour, and provide a steady flow of water. Billy Cadden, Popular Science, "The best electric gooseneck kettles," 31 Jan. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'spout.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of spout

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for spout

Verb

Middle English; akin to Middle Dutch spoiten to spout, Old English spīwan to spew

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Time Traveler for spout

Time Traveler

The first known use of spout was in the 14th century

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Statistics for spout

Last Updated

5 Jun 2020

Cite this Entry

“Spout.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/spout. Accessed 2 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for spout

spout

verb
How to pronounce spout (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of spout

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to shoot out (a liquid) with force
: to flow out with force
: to say or talk about (something) in a way that is boring or annoying

spout

noun

English Language Learners Definition of spout (Entry 2 of 2)

: a tube, pipe, or hole out of which a liquid flows
: a sudden strong stream of liquid

spout

verb
\ ˈspau̇t How to pronounce spout (audio) \
spouted; spouting

Kids Definition of spout

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to shoot out (liquid) with force Wells spouted oil.
2 : to speak with a long and quick flow of words so as to sound important He spouted his opinions at the meeting.
3 : to flow out with force : spurt Blood spouted from the wound.

spout

noun

Kids Definition of spout (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a tube, pipe, or hole through which something (as rainwater) shoots out
2 : a sudden strong stream of fluid

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More from Merriam-Webster on spout

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for spout

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with spout

Spanish Central: Translation of spout

Nglish: Translation of spout for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of spout for Arabic Speakers

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