speciation

noun
spe·​ci·​a·​tion | \ ˌspē-shē-ˈā-shən How to pronounce speciation (audio) , -sē- \

Definition of speciation

: the process of biological species formation

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Other Words from speciation

speciate \ ˈspē-​shē-​ˌāt How to pronounce speciation (audio) , -​sē-​ \ intransitive verb
speciational \ ˌspē-​shē-​ˈā-​shnəl How to pronounce speciation (audio) , -​sē-​ , -​shə-​nᵊl \ adjective

Examples of speciation in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web On the other hand, Bravo says places with low levels of species diversity and high rates of speciation may have so few species because their extreme, changeable environments keep killing off the newcomers. Alex Fox, Smithsonian Magazine, "Earth’s Harshest Ecosystems May Birth New Species Fastest," 10 Dec. 2020 In the other model, differences in species emerge in stages as a lineage cracks open opportunities available to it, which means that the rate of speciation can both rise and fall over time. Quanta Magazine, "New Fish Data Reveal How Evolutionary Bursts Create Species," 1 Dec. 2020 One explanation is that these periods of equilibrium were punctuated by mass extinction events that created new opportunities for speciation. Daniel Oberhaus, Wired, "A Ball of Bacteria Survived for 3 Years ... in Space!," 26 Aug. 2020 There were short spikes of speciation interspersed by longer periods of stasis. Daniel Oberhaus, Wired, "A Ball of Bacteria Survived for 3 Years ... in Space!," 26 Aug. 2020 Plant speciation accelerated again about 15 million years ago, when geologic evidence indicates monsoons intensified, reshaping the landscape. Erik Stokstad, Science | AAAS, "Many beloved garden flowers originated in this mountain hot spot—the oldest of its kind on Earth," 30 July 2020 The sequences of only one or a few genes cannot reveal the full history of speciation in oaks. Andrew L. Hipp, Scientific American, "How Oak Trees Evolved to Rule the Forests of the Northern Hemisphere," 15 July 2020 The oak genome is thus a mosaic shaped by speciation and hybridization. Andrew L. Hipp, Scientific American, "How Oak Trees Evolved to Rule the Forests of the Northern Hemisphere," 15 July 2020 Historically, speciation boosted the number of species more quickly than migration did, hence the steeper slope. Quanta Magazine, "Lizard Stowaways Revise Principle of Ecology," 24 Sep. 2014

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'speciation.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of speciation

1906, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for speciation

Time Traveler

The first known use of speciation was in 1906

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Cite this Entry

“Speciation.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/speciation. Accessed 2 Mar. 2021.

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Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about speciation

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