solace

verb
so·​lace | \ ˈsä-ləs also ˈsō- How to pronounce solace (audio) \
solaced; solacing

Definition of solace

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to give comfort to in grief or misfortune : console
2a : to make cheerful
b : amuse
3 : allay, soothe solace grief

solace

noun
so·​lace | \ ˈsä-ləs also ˈsō- How to pronounce solace (audio) \

Definition of solace (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : comfort in grief : alleviation of grief or anxiety
2 : a source of relief or consolation

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Other Words from solace

Verb

solacement \ ˈsä-​ləs-​mənt How to pronounce solacement (audio) also  ˈsō-​ \ noun
solacer noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for solace

Synonyms: Verb

assure, cheer, comfort, console, reassure, soothe

Synonyms: Noun

cheer, comfort, consolation, relief

Antonyms: Verb

distress, torment, torture, trouble

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Take Solace in This Word Origin

Noun

Solace was borrowed into English in the 14th century (via Anglo-French) from Latin solacium, which in turn derives from the Latin verb solari, meaning "to console." As you may have guessed, "solari" is also the source of the English words "console" and "consolation" (formed by combination with the prefix com-). In addition to the noun function, "solace" can be used as a verb ("he was solaced by the company of his children"). Also related are the nouns "solacer" ("one who solaces") and "solacement" ("an act of solacing or the condition of being solaced" or "something that solaces").

Examples of solace in a Sentence

Verb

Solaced by an abundance of whisky, champagne and cigars, he always bounced back, restoring and recreating himself through intensely active immersion in one or another of his varied interests … — Robert Kuttner, New York Times Book Review, 23 Oct. 1988 In this deplorable state, I contrived to do, what I take to have been, three Objective things. I got Mr. Franklin his sherry; I retired to my own room; and I solaced myself with the most composing pipe of tobacco I ever remember to have smoked in my life. — Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone, 1868 … and it was settled that Mr. Jones should be sent for early in the morning if Miss Bennet were not decidedly better. Bingley was quite uncomfortable; his sisters declared that they were miserable. They solaced their wretchedness, however, by duets after supper … — Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, 1813 counselors did their best to solace the bereaved children I solaced myself with a book while I waited for the bus.

Noun

Think your city's suffering? Imagine if your favorite team bolted town after 41 seasons, not for some cosmopolitan burg but a dusty outpost where oil derricks qualify as urban skyline. Now imagine turning to your city's other teams for solace only to find each to be avert-your-eyes abysmal. — Chris Ballard, Sports Illustrated, 10 Nov. 2008 It's important to explain what's going on, but some parents tell their child too much—about being lonely and frightened, about dates they're going on. Instead of the parent offering emotional solace to the child, the child is expected to provide it for the adult. People, 4 Mar. 2002 Poe's poem is a morbidly sentimental threnody on the same theme: the speaker blames the envious angels for taking his beloved from this world, and finds solace in lying beside her grave. — David Lodge, The Art of Fiction, 1992 Her presence was a great solace for me. the kind words brought a little solace to the grieving widow
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Having left her 1-year-old daughter, Millicent, in Washington with her parents, Mabel solaced herself with the bustle of dinners, carriage rides, musicales and games of whist mainly organized by the town’s eminent couple, Susan and Austin Dickinson. Brenda Wineapple, WSJ, "‘After Emily’ Review: The Belles of Amherst," 25 Oct. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

In the more immediate term, Golden State can take solace knowing that the proverbial cloud of Durant’s free agency has finally lifted. Connor Letourneau, SFChronicle.com, "A new era: With Kevin Durant gone, Warriors adjust expectations," 1 July 2019 The Hemons take solace in what remains: food, Ukrainian folk songs, Petar’s beekeeping practice (a hobby that crops up again and again in Hemon’s fiction). Ryu Spaeth, The New Republic, "Aleksandar Hemon’s Lost Eden," 6 June 2019 But this majestic cathedral has transcended that history, offering solace and an oasis of reflection to people of all backgrounds and religions, including me. Ingrid Abramovitch, ELLE Decor, "Notre-Dame Cathedral Symbolizes the Power of Architecture to Transform Lives," 16 Apr. 2019 Commiserating with other expectant mothers can be a powerful boon to pushing through the sluggishness of early pregnancy, and Hudson’s openness on her experience may offer solace for fellow mamas-to-be. Lauren Valenti, Vogue, "Kate Hudson Announces She’s Pregnant, Gets Real About First Trimester Challenges," 6 Apr. 2018 Neighbors and relatives poured in and out of the house, trying to offer solace, and someone asked Jim Ford, pastor of the New Day Christian Centre, to come by. Liz Brody, Glamour, "'I Accidentally Killed My Best Friend's Daughter'—How Two Women Recovered From the Worst Pain Imaginable," 21 Mar. 2018 While Sophie Turner suffers through her second underwhelming finale of the year, X-Men fans can seek solace in the comic book catalog of the franchise, which contains the following five pieces of classic Jean action. Graeme Mcmillan, WIRED, "5 Comics to Read After You've Seen Dark Phoenix," 7 June 2019 The Seahawks took some solace in holding Gurley to 77 yards on 22 carries in a 33-31 defeat last month in Seattle. Bob Condotta, The Seattle Times, "The Final Word: Bob Condotta breaks down what went wrong in the Seahawks’ close loss to the Rams," 13 Nov. 2018 During the famine of the 1990s, the family took some solace in thinking that everyone in the country was suffering. Brian Murphy, Washington Post, "A North Korean defector paid smugglers to get her family out. China sent them back.," 27 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'solace.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of solace

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for solace

Noun and Verb

Middle English solas, from Anglo-French, from Latin solacium, from solari to console

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Dictionary Entries near solace

sol

Sol

sola

solace

solaceful

solacious

solan

Statistics for solace

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Time Traveler for solace

The first known use of solace was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for solace

solace

noun

English Language Learners Definition of solace

formal : someone or something that gives a feeling of comfort to a person who is sad, depressed, etc. : a source of comfort

solace

noun
so·​lace | \ ˈsä-ləs How to pronounce solace (audio) , ˈsō-\

Kids Definition of solace

1 : comfort in times of sorrow or worry I'll seek solace in friends.
2 : something that gives comfort Books were his only solace.

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More from Merriam-Webster on solace

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with solace

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for solace

Spanish Central: Translation of solace

Nglish: Translation of solace for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of solace for Arabic Speakers

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