soapwort

noun

soap·​wort ˈsōp-ˌwərt How to pronounce soapwort (audio)
-ˌwȯrt

Examples of soapwort in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The addition of soapwort (a naturally occurring herb with an unfortunate-sounding name) adds anti-inflammatory properties and helps to tone and tighten. Tim Chan, The Hollywood Reporter, 10 May 2023 The name derives from the soapwort plant, Saponaria, which contains the Latin root for soap, sapo; this is a fitting name, given the compound’s propensity to foam when shaken in water [3]. Alice Chi Phung, Discover Magazine, 8 Mar. 2016 Originally named after their presence in the roots of the soapwort plant (Saponaria), saponins can dissolve in water to create a frothy broth. Wired, 14 July 2022 Trim bupleurum, white soapwort, blush Butterfly ranunculus, coral snapdragons, Colibri poppies, and pink ranunculus, varying the stem lengths and stripping off the lower leaves. Katie Strasberg Rousso, Southern Living, 26 Apr. 2021

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'soapwort.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

First Known Use

circa 1548, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of soapwort was circa 1548

Dictionary Entries Near soapwort

Cite this Entry

“Soapwort.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/soapwort. Accessed 22 May. 2024.

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