snow

noun, often attributive
\ ˈsnō How to pronounce snow (audio) \

Definition of snow

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : precipitation in the form of small white ice crystals formed directly from the water vapor of the air at a temperature of less than 32°F (0°C)
b(1) : a descent or shower of snow crystals
(2) : a mass of fallen snow crystals
2 : something resembling snow: such as
a : a dessert made of stiffly beaten whites of eggs, sugar, and fruit pulp apple snow
b : a usually white crystalline substance that condenses from a fluid phase as snow does ammonia snow
c slang
(1) : cocaine
(2) : heroin
d : small transient light or dark spots on a television screen

snow

verb
snowed; snowing; snows

Definition of snow (Entry 2 of 3)

intransitive verb

: to fall in or as snow

transitive verb

1 : to cause to fall like or as snow
2a : to cover, shut in, or imprison with or as if with snow
b : to deceive, persuade, or charm glibly
3 : to whiten like snow

Snow

biographical name
\ ˈsnō How to pronounce Snow (audio) \

Definition of Snow (Entry 3 of 3)

C(harles) P(ercy) 1905–1980 Baron Snow English novelist and physicist

Keep scrolling for more

Other Words from snow

Noun

snowless \ ˈsnō-​ləs How to pronounce Snow (audio) \ adjective

Examples of snow in a Sentence

Noun Snow fell softly on the town. The mountains were blanketed with snow. She took a walk in the snow. We haven't had much snow this year. She went out to shovel the snow. Soon the warm spring sun will melt the winter snows. the snows of the Rocky Mountains A light snow was falling. Verb easily snowed by her glib talk the years had snowed his hair to a silvery white, making it difficult at first to recognize her old high school crush
See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Walking to school in the snow and entirely uphill has got to be inspirational toward bolstering the parent-driving tales into some pretty amazing and nearly unbelievable yarns. Lance Eliot, Forbes, "Tall Tales By Your Grandparents About Walking Five Miles To School Will Instead Be About Using Self-Driving Cars For Your Kid’s Generation," 8 May 2021 This is a safer option than throwing food out in the snow because it can be more easily monitored and won't attract wild animals. Taysha Murtaugh, Country Living, "11 Brilliant Power Outage Hacks That Will Help You Brave the Next Winter Storm," 26 Apr. 2021 Urquidy didn’t get off to a good start in the snow, walking the leadoff hitter before giving up a single and a double to dig himself a 2-0 hole in the first inning. Matt Young, Chron, "Astros-Rockies playing through snow flurries in Colorado," 21 Apr. 2021 Pérez reviewed video of the flawed mechanics that contributed to his loss of the strike zone, and also abandoned his long-sleeve undershirt in favor of short sleeves in the snow. BostonGlobe.com, "Red Sox turnaround from calamitous 2020 revolves around the rotation," 13 Apr. 2021 They were congregated at a communal pee spot in the snow. Ned Rozell, Anchorage Daily News, "Don’t eat the yellow snow: Advice ignored by the salt-seeking white-winged crossbill," 3 Apr. 2021 Missy waits in the snow for the doors to open at the Winter Freeze on Dec 16. Paul Moakley, Time, "Deaths Among America's Homeless Are Soaring in the Pandemic. A Photographer Captures A Community In Crisis," 3 Apr. 2021 Some bettors may have found playing online a good alternative to going out in the snow and cold to visit a casino during late January and February. Carol Cain, Detroit Free Press, "Michigan's online sports betting launch was a big win. I talked to the man behind it," 3 Apr. 2021 Miguel Cabrera took a trot, eventually, in the snow at Comerica Park. Ben Walker, Star Tribune, "Opening Day: Snow, stars, fans and a virus postponement," 1 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The burning tree, located in the Board Camp Grove in the southwestern part of the park, endured rain and possibly snow over the winter, though not as much as normal because of the state’s dry conditions. Kurtis Alexander, San Francisco Chronicle, "Giant sequoia tree in Sequoia National Park still burning from last summer's wildfires," 5 May 2021 Kansas City will see up to 3 inches of April snow with up to 4 inches west of the city. Max Golembo, ABC News, "Winter storm moving from Rockies to Midwest as flooding rain hits Florida," 19 Apr. 2021 There could also be a change to snow elsewhere in interior portions of the state with a minor accumulation, mainly on the grass. courant.com, "Periods of rain, much cooler," 14 Apr. 2021 Christmas Eve is expected to bring a cold front in which rain is expected to change to snow around lunchtime Thursday. Cameron Fields, cleveland, "National Weather Service Cleveland upgrades winter storm watch to warning for Cuyahoga, Lake, Geauga and Ashtabula counties," 23 Dec. 2020 The land might even snow over while the smoldering persists undetected. Matt Simon, Wired, "How to Kill a Zombie Fire," 24 Mar. 2021 Besides, he's gone from being in cloudy, chilly conditions in Milwaukee, as it's forecast to snow there Thursday, to clear, sunny skies in the valley. Duane Rankin, The Arizona Republic, "Torrey Craig ready to contribute after joining Suns in mid-season trade with Bucks," 22 Mar. 2021 In summer, cool weather is welcome, and in winter, there’s often snow. Patricia Doherty, Travel + Leisure, "Palm Springs Travel Guide," 1 Mar. 2021 The rain will continue into the overnight, but as colder air works into the area there will be a changeover to snow for most, if not the entire state. courant.com, "Snow on the way," 17 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'snow.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

See More

First Known Use of snow

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for snow

Noun

Middle English, from Old English snāw; akin to Old High German snēo snow, Latin niv-, nix, Greek nipha (accusative)

Keep scrolling for more

Learn More about snow

Time Traveler for snow

Time Traveler

The first known use of snow was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Statistics for snow

Last Updated

11 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Snow.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/snow. Accessed 16 May. 2021.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

Keep scrolling for more

More Definitions for snow

snow

noun

English Language Learners Definition of snow

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: soft, white pieces of frozen water that fall to the ground from the sky in cold weather
: white dots that appear on the screen of a television when it is receiving a weak signal

snow

verb

English Language Learners Definition of snow (Entry 2 of 2)

used with it to say that snow is falling
US, informal : to impress, deceive, or persuade (someone)

snow

noun
\ ˈsnō How to pronounce snow (audio) \

Kids Definition of snow

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : small white crystals of ice formed directly from the water vapor of the air
2 : a mass of snowflakes fallen to earth a foot of snow

snow

verb
snowed; snowing

Kids Definition of snow (Entry 2 of 2)

: to fall or cause to fall in or as snow It's snowing west of here.

snow

noun
\ ˈsnō How to pronounce snow (audio) \

Medical Definition of snow

1 : any of various congealed or crystallized substances resembling snow in appearance carbon dioxide snow
2 slang
a : cocaine
b : heroin

Comments on snow

What made you want to look up snow? Please tell us where you read or heard it (including the quote, if possible).

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

Words Used by Nabokov Quiz

  • image1676440788
  • Choose the best definition or synonym for the word in bold: "There are some eructations that sound like cheers—at least, mine did." Lolita
Spell It

Can you spell these 10 commonly misspelled words?

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!