snow

noun, often attributive
\ ˈsnō \

Definition of snow

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : precipitation in the form of small white ice crystals formed directly from the water vapor of the air at a temperature of less than 32°F (0°C)
b(1) : a descent or shower of snow crystals
(2) : a mass of fallen snow crystals
2 : something resembling snow: such as
a : a dessert made of stiffly beaten whites of eggs, sugar, and fruit pulp apple snow
b : a usually white crystalline substance that condenses from a fluid phase as snow does ammonia snow

c slang

(1) : cocaine
(2) : heroin
d : small transient light or dark spots on a television screen

snow

verb
snowed; snowing; snows

Definition of snow (Entry 2 of 3)

intransitive verb

: to fall in or as snow

transitive verb

1 : to cause to fall like or as snow
2a : to cover, shut in, or imprison with or as if with snow
b : to deceive, persuade, or charm glibly
3 : to whiten like snow

Snow

biographical name
\ ˈsnō \

Definition of Snow (Entry 3 of 3)

C(harles) P(ercy) 1905–1980 Baron Snow English novelist and physicist

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Other Words from snow

Noun

snowless \ ˈsnō-​ləs \ adjective

Examples of snow in a Sentence

Noun

Snow fell softly on the town. The mountains were blanketed with snow. She took a walk in the snow. We haven't had much snow this year. She went out to shovel the snow. Soon the warm spring sun will melt the winter snows. the snows of the Rocky Mountains A light snow was falling.

Verb

easily snowed by her glib talk the years had snowed his hair to a silvery white, making it difficult at first to recognize her old high school crush
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex braved the snow to greet fans before a tour of Bristol Old Vic, which just happens to be the world's oldest working theatre (something that a former professional actress can truly appreciate? Kayleigh Roberts, Marie Claire, "Prince Harry's Reaction to Fan in Bristol Showing Him a Picture of Princess Diana Was So Emotional," 2 Feb. 2019 Yesterday morning in Bristol, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry braved the snow to greet members of the public who had lined the streets for the royals' visit. Caroline Hallemann, Town & Country, "The Reason Meghan Markle Holds Her Gloves But Doesn't Actually Wear Them," 2 Feb. 2019 Instead of rushing inside to escape the snow, Meghan and Harry generously spoke to people throughout the crowd, and seemed happy to make conversation with everyone who had braved the cold. Amy Mackelden, Harper's BAZAAR, "Meghan Markle & Prince Harry Greeting Children in the Snow Will Melt Your Heart," 1 Feb. 2019 In eastern North Dakota, officials have issued travel alerts because of blowing snow. Ivan Moreno, The Seattle Times, "Heavy snow hitting parts of Midwest; dangerous cold coming," 28 Jan. 2019 Four Jamaican bobsledders dream of competing in the Winter Olympics, despite never having seen snow. Alessandra Codinha, Vogue, "Sick of Holiday Movies? Help Is On the Way," 21 Dec. 2018 In the lead up to the 2018 Paralympics in Pyeongchang, Purdy hit the snow four to five days a week for four hours each day. Jenny Mccoy, SELF, "How Paralympic Medalist Amy Purdy Trains to Be a World-Class Snowboarder," 12 Dec. 2018 The overhang timber roof sheds snow to the north and the east of the building, sheltering both the entrance and an expansive second-floor deck. Megan Barber, Curbed, "Modern ski chalet wants $3.8M near Tahoe," 30 Nov. 2018 Between those two points there is a real possibility of encountering snow at practically any time of year. Kraig Becker, Popular Mechanics, "9 Things to Know Before You Hike the Pacific Crest Trail," 5 Nov. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The day the Royals game was snowed out: May 2, 2013 The Kansas City Royals played host to the Tampa Bay Rays at Kauffman Stadium on May 2, 2013. Maria Torres, kansascity, "Royals' series finale at Detroit postponed because of weather," 4 Apr. 2018 At the moment, everyone is working on the blizzard that snowed in most of North Carolina on December 9th, temporarily shutting down flights to FedEx’s regional hub in Greensboro. Jacqueline Detwiler, Popular Mechanics, "Inside FedEx’s Christmas Miracle," 19 Dec. 2018 But the delays and cancellations weren't just limited to the snowed-in spots. Meredith Carey, Condé Nast Traveler, "Winter Storm Bruce Leads to Flight Delays, Cancellations," 26 Nov. 2018 Both Chicago teams were snowed out at home April 9, and the Cubs had to postpone Monday night’s game against the St. Louis Cardinals after more snow and wind chills expected to be in the 20s. Nancy Armour, USA TODAY, "Major League Baseball would be better, and less vulnerable to weather, with 142-game season," 16 Apr. 2018 Their home opener was snowed out, and two games in Detroit were rained out, along with one and a third games here. New York Times, "Yankees’ Visit to Washington Was Brief, but Not Without Benefits," 16 May 2018 Thus, the effectiveness of targeting someone online by snowing their employer with incessant claims of outrageous past behavior and staging an outcry may already be greatly diminished. Aja Romano, Vox, "The “controversy” over journalist Sarah Jeong joining the New York Times, explained," 3 Aug. 2018 Assuming it will ever stop snowing No one throws a curve ball like Mother Nature. Editors, USA TODAY, "Teacher protests, 'Roseanne,' The Yankees and more things you need to know Tuesday," 3 Apr. 2018 Speaking of ice, the traditional trail along this section of the river has been snowed-in this season, unused, buried. Seth Kantner, Anchorage Daily News, "Moments of truth: Spring on the Kobuk," 28 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'snow.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of snow

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

History and Etymology for snow

Noun

Middle English, from Old English snāw; akin to Old High German snēo snow, Latin niv-, nix, Greek nipha (accusative)

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Statistics for snow

Last Updated

10 Feb 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for snow

The first known use of snow was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for snow

snow

noun

English Language Learners Definition of snow

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: soft, white pieces of frozen water that fall to the ground from the sky in cold weather
: white dots that appear on the screen of a television when it is receiving a weak signal

snow

verb

English Language Learners Definition of snow (Entry 2 of 2)

used with it to say that snow is falling
US, informal : to impress, deceive, or persuade (someone)

snow

noun
\ ˈsnō \

Kids Definition of snow

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : small white crystals of ice formed directly from the water vapor of the air
2 : a mass of snowflakes fallen to earth a foot of snow

snow

verb
snowed; snowing

Kids Definition of snow (Entry 2 of 2)

: to fall or cause to fall in or as snow It's snowing west of here.

snow

noun
\ ˈsnō \

Medical Definition of snow

1 : any of various congealed or crystallized substances resembling snow in appearance carbon dioxide snow

2 slang

a : cocaine
b : heroin

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More from Merriam-Webster on snow

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for snow

Spanish Central: Translation of snow

Nglish: Translation of snow for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of snow for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about snow

Comments on snow

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