sneeze

verb
\ ˈsnēz How to pronounce sneeze (audio) \
sneezed; sneezing

Definition of sneeze

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to make a sudden violent spasmodic audible expiration of breath through the nose and mouth especially as a reflex act
sneeze at
informal : to make light of always used in negative statements to indicate something that is important or deserves attention …a red ribbon for second place is not to be sneezed at or scorned.— Richard Peck Perquisites and severance pay are nothing to sneeze at [=are significant]

sneeze

noun

Definition of sneeze (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act or instance of sneezing

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Other Words from sneeze

Verb

sneezer noun

Examples of sneeze in a Sentence

Verb She was constantly sneezing and coughing.
Recent Examples on the Web: Verb This happens when someone close to you (within about six feet) is coughing, sneezing, talking, or even just breathing and releases droplets containing the virus, which can then land on your nose and mouth and enter your system. Tara C. Smith, SELF, "Yes, You Can Spread Coronavirus Even If You Don’t Have Symptoms," 31 Mar. 2020 Your biggest risk is if the delivery person sneezes or coughs on you. Michael Russell, oregonlive, "Oregon restaurant and bar closure FAQ: What’s closed, what’s open and what comes next," 19 Mar. 2020 These behaviors are especially relevant now that researchers have some evidence that, with the right temperature and humidity, SARS-CoV-2 can remain infectious for quite a long time after it’s sneezed or coughed out of an infected individual. Katherine J. Wu, Popular Science, "Everything you need to know about cleaning public surfaces in a pandemic," 16 Mar. 2020 Droplets are spread three to six feet if someone sneezes or coughs, then settle onto the floor and are not as transmissible as when a virus is airborne, when contamination stays in the air for much longer. Catherine Ho, SFChronicle.com, "Bay Area hospitals scramble to prepare for coronavirus; ‘when are we going to get the test kits?’," 26 Feb. 2020 The World Health Organization recommends being vigilant about good hygiene during the outbreak, including staying home when sick, sneezing into your elbow instead of your hand, refraining from touching your face and washing your hands frequently. Erin Schumaker, ABC News, "How you can help stop the spread of coronavirus, in pictures," 19 Mar. 2020 While traveling: Keep at least 6 feet away from fellow travelers who are sneezing, coughing or blowing their nose. Julie Washington, cleveland, "Tips for effective hand-washing during coronavirus outbreak, any time: Health Matters," 15 Mar. 2020 When interacting with a member of the public exhibiting upper respiratory symptoms (sneezing, coughing), provide them a surgical mask if one is available, or stand six feet away. Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times, "Keeping police officers healthy during coronavirus is essential. Here is what LAPD is doing," 11 Mar. 2020 How to differentiate between allergies and coronavirus Allergy symptoms can be debilitating: itchy, red, watery eyes; sneezing; runny nose and sometimes, coughing. Adam Taylor, Washington Post, "Live updates: As U.S. coronavirus cases top 1,000, mixed signs of recovery in China, South Korea," 11 Mar. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun As the set wound down, the digital crowd drifted away, back to their bottles of hand sanitizer and stockpiles of toilet paper, back to monitoring every sneeze as an omen of ill health. Jelani Cobb, The New Yorker, "D-Nice’s Club Quarantine Is What You Need," 22 Mar. 2020 So a member from your family can sneeze in their bedroom and even with the door shut, that sneeze can be transferred through the home several times in one hour. Ryan Nickerson, Houston Chronicle, "John Moore Services reminds people to check their home’s air quality," 16 Mar. 2020 Covid-19 most likely spreads via contact with virus-laden droplets expelled from an infected person’s cough, sneeze or breath. Jason Gale, Fortune, "Coronavirus symptoms: The progression from moderate to severe can occur ‘very, very quickly’," 8 Mar. 2020 Flowers on North Carolina peach trees are blooming early, before there are many bees around to pollinate them; other trees are releasing their sneeze-inducing pollen two months early, Conrad said. James Bruggers, The Courier-Journal, "In Louisville and dozens of cities east of the Mississippi, winter never really happened," 5 Mar. 2020 School officials have stepped up efforts to disinfect common areas daily and teach basic hygiene, including how to wash hands and sneeze into sleeves. Jill Tucker, SFChronicle.com, "Will coronavirus kill prom? Bay Area schools brace for closures and cancellation of events," 2 Mar. 2020 Droplets from coughs and sneezes containing the virus can also spread to surfaces touched by others. al, "Covid-19: Frequently asked questions," 2 Mar. 2020 Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. Tirion Morris, azcentral, "6 ways metro Phoenix restaurants can help keep diners safe during the coronavirus pandemic," 14 Mar. 2020 Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. Jeff Forward, Houston Chronicle, "As coronavirus cases increase in region, Woodlands officials monitor, prep strategies," 9 Mar. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sneeze.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sneeze

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1646, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for sneeze

Verb

Middle English snesen, alteration of fnesen, from Old English fnēosan; akin to Middle High German pfnūsen to snort, sneeze, Greek pnein to breathe

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Time Traveler for sneeze

Time Traveler

The first known use of sneeze was in the 14th century

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Statistics for sneeze

Last Updated

5 Apr 2020

Cite this Entry

“Sneeze.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sneeze. Accessed 7 Apr. 2020.

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More Definitions for sneeze

sneeze

verb
How to pronounce sneeze (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of sneeze

: to suddenly force air out through your nose and mouth with a usually loud noise because your body is reacting to dust, a sickness, etc.

sneeze

verb
\ ˈsnēz How to pronounce sneeze (audio) \
sneezed; sneezing

Kids Definition of sneeze

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to force the breath out in a sudden and noisy way

sneeze

noun

Kids Definition of sneeze (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act or instance of sneezing
\ ˈsnēz How to pronounce sneeze (audio) \
sneezed; sneezing

Medical Definition of sneeze

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make a sudden violent spasmodic audible expiration of breath through the nose and mouth especially as a reflex act following irritation of the nasal mucous membrane

sneeze

noun

Medical Definition of sneeze (Entry 2 of 2)

: an act or instance of sneezing

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More from Merriam-Webster on sneeze

Spanish Central: Translation of sneeze

Nglish: Translation of sneeze for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of sneeze for Arabic Speakers

Comments on sneeze

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