shepherd

noun
shep·​herd | \ˈshe-pərd \

Definition of shepherd 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a person who tends sheep

2 : pastor

shepherd

verb
shepherded; shepherding; shepherds

Definition of shepherd (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to tend as a shepherd

2 : to guide or guard in the manner of a shepherd shepherded the bill through Congress

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Synonyms for shepherd

Synonyms: Verb

coach, counsel, guide, lead, mentor, pilot, show, tutor

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Examples of shepherd in a Sentence

Verb

She carefully shepherded the children across the street. They shepherded the bill through Congress.

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

The shepherd later confessed to the murder and led police to the boy’s body, Agenda. Katherine Lam, Fox News, "Father, toddler son shot dead in Georgia; mother falls into ravine while fleeing attacker, officials say," 9 July 2018 Sure enough, peak precious came just before or around weaning — at 7.7 weeks for the Jack Russells, 8.3 weeks for the white shepherds and 6.3 weeks for the Cane Corsos. Karin Brulliard, Washington Post, "Puppies’ cuteness peaks right when they need humans most, study finds," 19 May 2018 But there’s no manger, shepherds, wise men or angels; just a chain-link fence surrounding the couple and the newborn. Kristine Phillips, Washington Post, "A church put Jesus, Mary and Joseph in ‘ICE detention’ to protest Trump’s immigration policies," 3 July 2018 Certain breeds are considered heavy shedders, including dogs with arctic breed-type fur (like huskies), retriever coats and shepherd-y pelts, but any kind of dog will shed. Dr. Patty Khuly, miamiherald, "Shedding is a normal for dogs; most times no need to be concerned," 8 June 2018 The pair -- along with Markle's other rescue dog, a shepherd mix named Bogart -- were pictured cozying up on Markle's couch and gazing lovingly at each other outside on a summer day. Christina Capatides, CBS News, "The newest royal dog isn't a corgi; he's a rescue beagle from the U.S.," 23 May 2018 Along the way are rowdy choir boys, a nosy Sacristan, a wistful shepherd boy, and a gallery of malevolent henchmen. David Patrick Stearns, Philly.com, "Love 'Tosca'? Philadelphia Orchestra's staging doesn't disappoint," 13 May 2018 For much of the past decade, a group of shepherds had been quietly taking small groups of tourists to the mountain as part of a five-day hike around the fast-melting Ausangate glacier. Fox News, "Tourists flocking to Peru's newfound 'Rainbow Mountain'," 2 May 2018 Residents here still speak Sardo, the closest living form of Latin; veiled grandmothers and bands of nomadic shepherds gaze warily at outsiders; and residents fiercely proclaim that Sardinia isn’t Italy. Eliot Stein, Condé Nast Traveler, "A Pagan Exorcism in Sardinia," 29 Mar. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Taking a cue from the Obama handbook, Hillary Clinton has identified the next fulfilling step in her career: shepherding her talents away from D.C. and toward the small screen. Devon Elizabeth, Teen Vogue, "Hillary Clinton and Steven Spielberg Are Bringing a Women's Suffrage Drama to TV," 2 Aug. 2018 Each of these hallmarks of the treasured American pastime emerged after 1882, when Chris von der Ahe purchased the bankrupt St. Louis baseball club ― and shepherded fans to his nearby beer garden. Isaac Stanley-becker, chicagotribune.com, "Inventor who made ballpark beer flow freely dies after being trapped in cooler at Braves stadium," 28 June 2018 Left behind in the throes of evacuations from the Pawnee Fire in Lake County, all those animals were saved from impending flames and shepherded to a county shelter. Jordan Cutler-tietjen, sacbee, "When wildfires strike, animals get left behind. Meet the Lake County team that rescues them.," 25 June 2018 Until recently, Dent led the committee that oversaw spending on military construction projects and veterans, and one of his last major acts in Congress was shepherding a $96.9 billion bill through the House Appropriations Committee. Jonathan Tamari, Philly.com, "Ex-Rep. Charlie Dent joins major law firm with offices in Philly, D.C.," 30 May 2018 Even in rural towns and villages where reeds grow and shepherd’s music originated, the instrument is not well known. Taylor Luck, The Christian Science Monitor, "In rediscovered reed flute, a soulful link to Jordanian identity," 13 July 2018 They were then strapped to one of two rescue divers tasked with shepherding each boy through the underwater parts of the system, and bundled into stretchers to be carried through the dry parts. Radhika Viswanathan, Vox, "New information suggests the 12 Thai boys trapped in a cave were medicated and carried out on stretchers during the rescue operation.," 11 July 2018 But the people who make the lunch and shepherd the children and paint the more interesting paintings have names, and McKenna has provided a valuable service in giving them credit for their labors. Charlotte Shane, The New Republic, "Living in David Lynch’s Art Life," 26 June 2018 Dedicated to shepherding young New York City residents into backstage careers, the Theatrical Workforce Development Program aims to diversify a branch of the industry that historically has been heavily white and male. New York Times, "Falling for the Lure of the Stage. The Backstage.," 18 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'shepherd.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of shepherd

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1790, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for shepherd

Noun

Middle English sheepherde, from Old English scēaphyrde, from scēap sheep + hierde herdsman; akin to Old English heord herd

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Statistics for shepherd

Last Updated

11 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for shepherd

The first known use of shepherd was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for shepherd

shepherd

noun

English Language Learners Definition of shepherd

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a person whose job is to take care of sheep

shepherd

verb

English Language Learners Definition of shepherd (Entry 2 of 2)

: to guide (someone or something)

shepherd

noun
shep·​herd | \ˈshe-pərd \

Kids Definition of shepherd

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a person who takes care of and guards a flock of sheep

shepherd

verb
shepherded; shepherding

Kids Definition of shepherd (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to take care of and guard a flock of sheep

2 : to gather, lead, or move in the manner of a shepherd She shepherded the children across the playground.

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