seduce

verb
se·​duce | \ si-ˈdüs How to pronounce seduce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
seduced; seducing

Definition of seduce

transitive verb

1 : to persuade to disobedience or disloyalty
2 : to lead astray usually by persuasion or false promises
3 : to carry out the physical seduction of : entice to sexual intercourse
4 : attract

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Other Words from seduce

seducer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for seduce

lure, entice, inveigle, decoy, tempt, seduce mean to lead astray from one's true course. lure implies a drawing into danger, evil, or difficulty through attracting and deceiving. lured naive investors with get-rich-quick schemes entice suggests drawing by artful or adroit means. advertising designed to entice new customers inveigle implies enticing by cajoling or flattering. fund-raisers inveigling wealthy alumni decoy implies a luring into entrapment by artifice. attempting to decoy the enemy into an ambush tempt implies the presenting of an attraction so strong that it overcomes the restraints of conscience or better judgment. tempted by the offer of money seduce implies a leading astray by persuasion or false promises. seduced by assurances of assistance

Examples of seduce in a Sentence

He tried to seduce her. She was seduced by an older man. The other team seduced him with a better offer.
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Recent Examples on the Web

This pastoral, gently lyrical piece was designed not to dazzle listeners but to seduce them. Howard Reich, chicagotribune.com, "CSO review: Orchestra's soloists step into the spotlight," 14 June 2019 But the notion has also riled up plenty of critics, who argue that researchers relying on the 2D:4D comparison have been seduced by a simplistic, faulty measure. Alex Fox, Science | AAAS, "Top stories: The limits of human performance, sloth evolution, and the magic finger ratio," 7 June 2019 The outdoors Roman Garden Theatre is the locale for Kevin G. Coleman’s production of Shakespeare’s comedy about Sir John Falstaff’s bumbling efforts to seduce those Merry Wives and gain access to their husbands’ money. Don Aucoin, BostonGlobe.com, "A dozen shows to see in the Berkshires this summer," 27 June 2019 In order to seduce a woman, a man must be prepared to go flower-picking with her, to play in her doll house, and, perhaps most essentially, cultivate her closest friend (who, in an ideal society, would be her wet nurse’s daughter). Manu S Pillai, Quartz India, "When a British official dodged Victorian prudery to publish the Kamasutra in English," 27 June 2019 Then, to general surprise, they were discovered again, put back on display, and were found, to further surprise perhaps, to have lost none of their power to seduce. James Fenton, The New York Review of Books, "Nasty & Nice," 9 May 2019 Just as Babitz introduced her slender 1977 masterpiece Slow Days, Fast Company as an effort to seduce not the reader but a disinterested boyfriend, so Anolik announces this book as her own wayward, digressive romance. Lidija Haas, Harper's magazine, "New Books," 10 Jan. 2019 But even conscience is wavering and easily seduced, a temporary fix at best. Marilynne Robinson, Harper's magazine, "Is Poverty Necessary?," 10 June 2019 John Washburn’s Balinese teak wood tables can’t seduce you inside the Sullivan. Amy Drew Thompson, orlandosentinel.com, "Slainté! Sanfording at The Sullivan is trad and true ... and pretty tasty," 4 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'seduce.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of seduce

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for seduce

Late Latin seducere, from Latin, to lead away, from se- apart + ducere to lead — more at tow entry 1

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Dictionary Entries near seduce

sedjadeh

Sedna

sedra

seduce

seducee

seducement

seducible

Statistics for seduce

Last Updated

19 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for seduce

The first known use of seduce was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for seduce

seduce

verb

English Language Learners Definition of seduce

: to persuade (someone) to have sex with you
: to persuade (someone) to do something

seduce

verb
se·​duce | \ si-ˈdüs How to pronounce seduce (audio) , -ˈdyüs\
seduced; seducing

Kids Definition of seduce

: to persuade (someone) to do something and especially to do something wrong She was seduced into crime.

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More from Merriam-Webster on seduce

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for seduce

Spanish Central: Translation of seduce

Nglish: Translation of seduce for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of seduce for Arabic Speakers

Comments on seduce

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appealing forcibly to the mind or reason

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