salicin

noun

sal·​i·​cin ˈsa-lə-sən How to pronounce salicin (audio)
: a bitter white crystalline glucoside C13H18O7 found in the bark and leaves of several willows and poplars and used in medicine like salicylic acid

Examples of salicin in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web After all, willow branches were chewed for centuries to relieve fever and pain before scientists were able to isolate salicin from its bark — a discovery which led to aspirin. Christie Wilcox, Discover Magazine, 14 Feb. 2016 Compared to salicylic acid, which is created using a chemical process, salicin is naturally found in willow bark and has antioxidative, antimicrobial, and soothing properties. Beth Janes, Good Housekeeping, 7 Feb. 2020

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'salicin.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

French salicine, from Latin salic-, salix willow — more at sallow

First Known Use

1830, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of salicin was in 1830

Dictionary Entries Near salicin

Cite this Entry

“Salicin.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/salicin. Accessed 18 Apr. 2024.

Medical Definition

salicin

noun
sal·​i·​cin ˈsal-i-sin How to pronounce salicin (audio)
: a bitter white crystalline glucoside C13H18O7 found in the bark and leaves of several willows and poplars, yielding saligenin and glucose on hydrolysis, and formerly used in medicine as an antipyretic, antirheumatic, and tonic
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