sabotage

noun
sab·o·tage | \ ˈsa-bə-ˌtäzh \

Definition of sabotage 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : destruction of an employer's property (such as tools or materials) or the hindering of manufacturing by discontented workers

2 : destructive or obstructive action carried on by a civilian or enemy agent to hinder a nation's war effort

3a : an act or process tending to hamper or hurt

b : deliberate subversion

sabotage

verb
sabotaged; sabotaging

Definition of sabotage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to practice sabotage on

Examples of sabotage in a Sentence

Noun

Angry workers were responsible for the sabotage of the machines. Officials have not yet ruled out sabotage as a possible cause of the crash.

Verb

They sabotaged the enemy's oil fields. The airplane crashed because it was sabotaged. The lawyer is trying to sabotage the case by creating confusion. The deal was sabotaged by an angry employee.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Tesla accused a former technician at the Nevada Gigafactory of launching a sabotage campaign after being denied a promotion. BostonGlobe.com, "SHYFT Analytics to be acquird by New York company," 21 June 2018 The electric-auto maker accused Martin Tripp, a former technician at the Nevada Gigafactory, of launching a sabotage campaign after being denied a promotion. Bloomberg, latimes.com, "Tesla sues ex-employee, accusing him of sabotage campaign," 20 June 2018 Assuming Golden State doesn’t self-sabotage, the responsibility of restoring suspense to the NBA falls on James, per usual. Lee Jenkins, SI.com, "Kevin Durant and the Dagger That Foreshadowed the Broom," 12 June 2018 The Republican sabotage campaign isn’t going to transfer resources from the middle class to the poor on net. Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer, "Republican Campaign Message: We Had to Jack Up Your Insurance Premiums to Help the Poor," 19 Apr. 2018 Kim appeared to have solved the problems that plagued the Musudan — and perhaps outmaneuvered the U.S. sabotage program. Author: David E. Sanger, William J. Broad, Anchorage Daily News, "How North Korea’s nuclear pace caught the U.S. off guard," 7 Jan. 2018 Consumer advocates and Democrats in Congress were properly appalled at the administration’s latest act of sabotage. Michael Hiltzik, latimes.com, "In another act of sabotage, Trump slashes Obamacare outreach funding to the bone," 10 July 2018 This act of sabotage against fellow Ministers was jaw-dropping on so many levels—even for a politician for whom ambition is like a flesh-eating disease coursing through his body. Jeet Heer, The New Republic, "British prime minister, predictably, loses her loud-mouthed foreign secretary.," 9 July 2018 Following through with this latest act of sabotage could raise rates for all consumers even more. Robert Pear, New York Times, "Health Insurers Warn of Market Turmoil as Trump Suspends Billions in Payments," 7 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Juventus sabotaged itself in the quarterfinals with a clumsy tackle that rewarded Real with a last-second penalty kick. Joshua Robinson, WSJ, "Real Madrid Tops Liverpool in Champions League Final," 26 May 2018 Trump has sabotaged several aspects of the law, creating premium spikes that will harm many state exchanges and make insurance unaffordable for many customers who now have it. Jonathan Chait, Daily Intelligencer, "Trump Wishes He Could Destroy Obama’s Legacy. He Hasn’t. And Won’t.," 20 May 2018 Symptoms generally include a lack of enthusiasm for social life; sluggish and self-sabotaging tendencies leading to sudden and dramatic weight gain; as well as general reclusiveness and constant fatigue. Maiysha Kai, The Root, "Just an Ordinary Pain: Living With Persistent Depressive Disorder," 16 May 2018 Smith has repeatedly sabotaged Cleveland’s defense with halfhearted switches and lethargic closeouts. Christopher L. Gasper, BostonGlobe.com, "Celtics making path to NBA Finals a mission possible," 16 May 2018 Republicans didn’t need to sabotage themselves the way Ryan proposed Imagine, then, a world where the Republican Party hadn’t embraced Ryan as their guru, where a more Christian Democratic faction took over the party in 2009 and 2010. Dylan Matthews, Vox, "Paul Ryan paved the way for Trump’s takeover of the Republican Party," 11 Apr. 2018 That’s because county social workers have been sabotaging themselves. John Schmid, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Foxconn's promised jobs boom could miss neighboring city Racine," 6 Apr. 2018 Black said the police department is among the best in the country and Isaac deserves to work in an environment where members of his team are not trying to sabotage him. Dan Horn, Cincinnati.com, "Cincinnati city manager: Feds should investigate 'rogue element' at police department," 7 Mar. 2018 Alongside Can, Kraftwerk, and Neu!, Faust created a chemistry lab of music, sometimes jarring, often trance-inducing, either passively disregarding or actively sabotaging all existing convention. James Sullivan, BostonGlobe.com, "For krautrock icons Faust, the revolution goes on," 11 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sabotage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sabotage

Noun

1910, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1913, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for sabotage

Noun

French, from saboter to clatter with sabots, botch, sabotage, from sabot

Noun

French, from saboter to clatter with wooden shoes, botch, sabotage, from sabot wooden shoe

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Dictionary Entries near sabotage

sabora

saboraic

sabot

sabotage

saboteur

sabotier

sabra

Statistics for sabotage

Last Updated

20 Sep 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for sabotage

The first known use of sabotage was in 1910

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More Definitions for sabotage

sabotage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of sabotage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of destroying or damaging something deliberately so that it does not work correctly

sabotage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of sabotage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to destroy or damage (something) deliberately so that it does not work correctly

: to cause the failure of (something) deliberately

sabotage

noun
sab·o·tage | \ ˈsa-bə-ˌtäzh \

Kids Definition of sabotage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: deliberate destruction of or damage to property Angry workers used sabotage to disable the factory's machinery.

sabotage

verb
sabotaged; sabotaging

Kids Definition of sabotage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to damage or destroy on purpose : to engage in sabotage The country's water supply was sabotaged by the retreating enemy.

sabotage

noun
sab·o·tage | \ ˈsa-bə-ˌtäzh \

Legal Definition of sabotage 

1 : the willful destruction of an employer's property or the hindering of normal operations by other means

2 : the injury, destruction, or knowingly defective production of materials, premises, or utilities used for war or national defense — compare criminal syndicalism, sedition

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