sabotage

noun
sab·​o·​tage | \ˈsa-bə-ˌtäzh \

Definition of sabotage 

(Entry 1 of 2)

1 : destruction of an employer's property (such as tools or materials) or the hindering of manufacturing by discontented workers

2 : destructive or obstructive action carried on by a civilian or enemy agent to hinder a nation's war effort

3a : an act or process tending to hamper or hurt

b : deliberate subversion

sabotage

verb
sabotaged; sabotaging

Definition of sabotage (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to practice sabotage on

Examples of sabotage in a Sentence

Noun

Angry workers were responsible for the sabotage of the machines. Officials have not yet ruled out sabotage as a possible cause of the crash.

Verb

They sabotaged the enemy's oil fields. The airplane crashed because it was sabotaged. The lawyer is trying to sabotage the case by creating confusion. The deal was sabotaged by an angry employee.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Three biographies were attempted during his lifetime, and all met with varying degrees of resistance and sabotage from their subject. Adam Kirsch, WSJ, "Watching the Lights Go Out," 8 Nov. 2018 Project Veritas catching employees within Government Accountability Office bragging about breaking the rules, resistance, sabotage within the Trump campaign, in all aspects of government. Fox News, "President Trump talks Kavanaugh controversy, Russia probe," 20 Sep. 2018 Five years ago, sabotage and an earthquake threatened the last election, and as a new election approaches, an unknown group is attacking the underlying infrastructure of the system. Andrew Liptak, The Verge, "9 science fiction and fantasy books coming out this September you should add to your reading list," 1 Sep. 2018 Fixed rocket launch pads in California, Florida, and elsewhere are vulnerable to sabotage and other forms of attack, but Stratolaunch could operate from many secure military air bases. Kyle Mizokami, Popular Mechanics, "Does Stratolaunch Have a Top Secret Purpose?," 22 Aug. 2018 Days after the Allied invasion of Normandy in June 1944, Prince Michel was part of a three-man sabotage team tasked with preventing 23,000 German troops from getting to Normandy, the Washington Post notes. Maggie Maloney, Town & Country, "Prince Philip’s Cousin Was a Paratrooper Who Helped Liberate France From the Nazis," 20 Aug. 2018 But by then Bugatti was dead again, victim to a global recession—and maybe even sabotage from other car companies. Jonathan M. Gitlin, Ars Technica, "This Bugatti EB110 video is a great reminder of the 1990s supercar boom," 13 Aug. 2018 Musk offered no evidence that any short seller or company was involved in sabotage. Russ Mitchell, latimes.com, "Musk claims sabotage with list of haters who want Tesla 'to die'," 19 June 2018 Three years later, General Pinochet and his accomplices—with CIA assistance, and aided by a sustained U.S. campaign of economic sabotage—ended at gunpoint Chile’s experiment in parliamentary socialism. Benjamin Kunkel, The New Republic, "The partisan world of Pablo Neruda," 2 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

That has rightfully raised concerns that Whitaker might now attempt to sabotage Mueller’s investigation. Murray Waas, Vox, "Exclusive: Trump loyalist Matthew Whitaker was counseling the White House on investigating Clinton," 9 Nov. 2018 President Siebert most likely gets to keep his job without being reprimanded for nearly sabotaging a woman's career. Jessica Radloff, Glamour, "The Big Bang Theory," 18 Oct. 2018 In South Korea, Samsung Electronics chairman Lee Sang-hoon has been indicted for sabotaging attempts to unionize. Elizabeth Lopatto, The Verge, "What Tesla’s union-busting trial means for the rest of Silicon Valley," 29 Sep. 2018 DeMarcus Cousins isn’t for everyone: The polarizing center’s size, skill and reliable 25/10 production come gift-wrapped in a deep pile of red flags that have repeatedly sabotaged and sidetracked his NBA career. Ben Golliver, SI.com, "The DeMarcus Cousins Experience Isn’t for Everyone, but Warriors Are More Than Ready," 2 July 2018 Comey depicts the president as being fixated with sabotaging the Russia investigation. Alex Shephard, The New Republic, "Is James Comey Helping?," 16 Apr. 2018 The attacks, known as Dragonfly, pierced many layers of security and would have allowed the intruders to sabotage systems, experts say. Peter Baker, BostonGlobe.com, "Trump administration sanctions Russians for election meddling and cyberattacks," 15 Mar. 2018 Since Republican campaigns to kill Obamacare failed in Congress last year, the Trump administration has been taking every opportunity to sabotage the Affordable Care Act. Margaret Hartmann, Daily Intelligencer, "Trump Administration Aims to Steer People Toward Junk Health Plans Over Obamacare," 11 July 2018 The Iranian government said the arrests were a plot to sabotage a visit to Europe by President Hassan Rouhani. The Economist, "Politics this week," 5 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'sabotage.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of sabotage

Noun

1910, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1913, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for sabotage

Noun

French, from saboter to clatter with sabots, botch, sabotage, from sabot

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Dictionary Entries near sabotage

sabora

saboraic

sabot

sabotage

saboteur

sabotier

sabra

Statistics for sabotage

Last Updated

15 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for sabotage

The first known use of sabotage was in 1910

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More Definitions for sabotage

sabotage

noun

English Language Learners Definition of sabotage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: the act of destroying or damaging something deliberately so that it does not work correctly

sabotage

verb

English Language Learners Definition of sabotage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to destroy or damage (something) deliberately so that it does not work correctly

: to cause the failure of (something) deliberately

sabotage

noun
sab·​o·​tage | \ˈsa-bə-ˌtäzh \

Kids Definition of sabotage

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: deliberate destruction of or damage to property Angry workers used sabotage to disable the factory's machinery.

sabotage

verb
sabotaged; sabotaging

Kids Definition of sabotage (Entry 2 of 2)

: to damage or destroy on purpose : to engage in sabotage The country's water supply was sabotaged by the retreating enemy.

sabotage

noun
sab·​o·​tage | \ˈsa-bə-ˌtäzh \

Legal Definition of sabotage 

1 : the willful destruction of an employer's property or the hindering of normal operations by other means

2 : the injury, destruction, or knowingly defective production of materials, premises, or utilities used for war or national defense — compare criminal syndicalism, sedition

History and Etymology for sabotage

French, from saboter to clatter with wooden shoes, botch, sabotage, from sabot wooden shoe

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Comments on sabotage

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